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Senior Goof
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

I haven't fly fished since I was a kid and feel I am doing myself a major disservice. I fish rivers but not the way god intended - with a fly rod.

So, I would like to get back into it. With Black Friday in swing I saw a few deals, and am open to other recommends.

Here are two I saw:



I had seen a few more and now can't find them (I will).

Anyways - thoughts on above? Other suggestions?

Length and line weight?


Thank you very much in advanced!
 

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Depends on what kind of water and species you plan to fish. If you're going to primarily focus on brushy creeks for pan size trout, a shorter 3 weight 7 foot rod is the better option.

If you're going to focus on wide open tail water for larger 20"+ trout, then an 8-1/2 to 9 foot 4/5 weight is a good option.

As far as brand goes starting out, Fenwick, TFO, and Redington are good rods that won't break the bank.

My go to rod for tailwaters and a large rainbows is a 4 wt 8' Scott with weight forward line.

I'm sure there are others that will chime in that have A River Runs Through It memorized word for word...
 

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I would go with a 9' 5 weight. That is the "all around" rod. It will handle any stream situation Utah can throw at it, and will also work for the bigger rivers of Wyoming and Idaho if you need it to. You'd also be able to use it on still waters when you want as well.

If you are primarily fishing streams in Utah, then get a floating line. The only time you'd need a sinking tip would be for something bigger, like the Green. Everything else can be managed with a floating.

As for memorizing A River Runs Through It.....that's for the rookies. Read The River Why, then come back and we'll have a discussion.
 
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I don't have "A River Runs through It" memorized, so I'm probably not qualified to answer, but here goes anyway. If you can, visit a dealer and test out a few rods for "feel". You might like one particular one especially well among several candidates. The 9' 5 weight sounds like good advice for this area. (I couldn't get your links to work due to a security warning, so I don't know what you are considering.)
 

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I personally don't like moderate action fly rods, but I'm sure either of those options would be just fine. I would want moderate/fast or fast action, myself. But again, either of those would work to catch fish. Moderate action is good for smaller waters and some "beginners" prefer them, I just don't love the floppy feel, personally. If you were only ever going to buy one fly rod, I'd agree with PBH that 9' 5 wt is the most universal option. That said, who only wants one fly rod? That sounds boring, and life is not supposed to be boring!

I am assuming the rivers you speak of are of the smaller variety. (IE, Logan, Ogden, Weber, Provo, etc. or smaller) I'd actually suggest a 4 wt for those rivers and smaller streams, and then get a 6 wt for the Green and the larger rivers PBH mentioned in Wyoming and Idaho. (The 9.5 foot variety) Yes, a 5 wt is sufficient, no doubt. But I'll tell you, every single person that tries out a 6 wt on those bigger rivers with me ends up buying a 6 wt. Heck, my brother even wanted a 7 wt after doing a float trip with his daughter and tossing the guide's 7 wt this summer. A 5 wt does put you a little under-gunned with big fish on faster moving water. Doable, but again, "doable" seems boring to me. Also, make sure you get a 4 piece rod. You'll thank me later.

This is like anything else in the outdoor recreation arena: you have a billion options, and almost all of them will "work" for you just fine. You do get what you pay for, however. Don't listen to PBH when he starts talking about how you can kill a deer in an old red flannel shirt and levis from Walmart, because he outfitted himself in the single most expensive brand of hunting clothing for a reason...it makes the pursuit more comfortable and enjoyable! There is absolutely a difference in quality when you pay $17.99 for a pair of pants versus $140 for a pair of Sitka Mountain pants. It's no different with fly rods, reels, waders, boats, guns, bows, or anything else.

Here is another option that may be a slight upgrade over the ones you mentioned. Then again, it might not... https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/Red...irsharedid=&irgwc=1&hvarAID=impact&cm_soc=AFF
 

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A 9.5' rod would be a nightmare on small overgrown and brushy streams/creeks.

It's overkill for smaller rivers like the Blacksmith Fork and Logan.

But each to their own preference.
You'll notice that my recommendation for a 9.5 foot 6 wt is for bigger rivers like the Green and up and a second rod.

That said, I'd take my 9.5 6 wt on the Logan and BSF any day of the week! It performs awesome in those situations. It's overkill for the size of fish you're normally catching, but having a bit longer rod to high stick in those situations can be very helpful, actually.
 

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Don't listen to PBH ... because he outfitted himself in the single most expensive brand of hunting clothing for a reason...
How'd you know that I like to out-do my in-laws??
they swear by Dodge. So I bought a GMC.
they wear Kuiu. So I wear Sitka.
they buy Louisville. So I buy Demarini.
:devilish:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you so far for the advice. It's crazy because when I think of all the fishing I have done and fish I have caught without owning a baitcast reel (which I know are nice), the spectrum of rods and reels pricing gets fuzzy. I don't want to go cheap, but I also don't need something insane yet - if I get super into it and go on big expeditions then I would move to that.

I just want something good that functions well and lasts.

I will be fishing primarily Blacksmith, Ogden, Weber, Logan as I am a Northern Utah guy. Weber and Ogden will get the most usage.
 

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I just want something good that functions well and lasts.

I will be fishing primarily Blacksmith, Ogden, Weber, Logan as I am a Northern Utah guy. Weber and Ogden will get the most usage.
The 9' 5 wt is perfect for those rivers. I have been really happy with a recent purchase of my Redington and the cost didn't break the bank.
 

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For the rivers you mentioned I would go with a 4 weight. I was in your same shoes a few years ago and I ended up going with a 9'5 and if I could go back I'd go down to the 4. There are big enough fish in both that a 5 is nice but the smaller rod will give you more control in your casting/presentation on smaller water. I mostly fish the Ogden though and get into more narrow water than what is typical for the Weber. I will second what Vanilla said as well regarding rod action. I fish a moderate/fast and will purchase a fast next. As far as brands go, two that stood out to me at the intro price points are Echo and specifically the Orvis Clearwater. I fish the Carbon XL and my buddy uses a Clearwater. Both have good warranties and customer service. I am really happy with my Echo and have fished everything from the big Boulder Mtn and Uinta lakes to small streams while backpacking/camping. Echo has three quality rods under $250 that would be good to start out with. Only bummer is they are made in China, which is true for any budget rod these days, especially cabela's rods. would also say spend a little less on a rod and especially a reel initially and invest in a really good line. Buy a cheap WF floating line first, practice your cast, go to local fly shop and tell them what your casts are looking like, have them recommend a style of line that suits your casting style. Rio and Airflo are the best in my opinion.
 

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Just go out and spend a couple G's on a rod and gear, get the finest and most expensive waders, hat, vest, glasses, etc. Then hit any river and "fake it until you make it". You'll also need to be driving a Tesla or any other 150K + vehicle.

Anymore it isn't about fishing and catching, its more about looking like you belong there. Similar to that Garth Brooks song....Friends in low places.

I'm more of a beer-N-whisky shot guy than a champagne sipper anyway. "I is what I is, and you don't like it....move on".
 

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I primarily fish smaller streams and love my 7’ 3 wt. If the Green, Madison, and other types of those rivers were my primary waters, I’d have something bigger. Lots of good options!
 

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You'll notice that my recommendation for a 9.5 foot 6 wt is for bigger rivers like the Green and up and a second rod.

That said, I'd take my 9.5 6 wt on the Logan and BSF any day of the week! It performs awesome in those situations. It's overkill for the size of fish you're normally catching, but having a bit longer rod to high stick in those situations can be very helpful, actually.
Wasn't referring to your post.

I used to fish the Logan, Blacksmith, Right Hand, Left Hand, and all the others with a 7' 3 wt Redington back in the day on purpose.

Left the utility pole at home when I went back and visited for the "Juan".
 

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taxidermist: I’m missing the Tesla! I wonder how much driving one would increase my catch rate?

Definitely worth the try. I’m starting a GoFundMe campaign for my new Tesla.
 

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taxidermist: I’m missing the Tesla! I wonder how much driving one would increase my catch rate?

Definitely worth the try. I’m starting a GoFundMe campaign for my new Tesla.
LOL !! I'm not sure, I'd guess you would increase at least 2 more fish each trip plus, I'm sure the fish would be at least 22 inchers.

I've not been fly-fishing for at least 15 years. Guiding took the passion and relaxation out of it for me. In all honesty, If one is proficient in the "Art" of casting and understands what is needed to catch fish, they could do it with a 6' willow branch. The newer nice rods ($500 +) will be like graduating from the VW Bug to the Tesla. Balance, action and tips make a big difference to those that have been playing the game for many years. So many types of line are out now that help with the learning curve. I think if I were to walk into Fish Tech, I would be like a "newbie" trying to figure out all the many choices that are on the wall.

Would my PENN 309 be ok on my Sage 7wt Rod?? :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok so Redington has 30% off on some combos - any preference on the 3 of them?


I felt confident based on this thread until they started talking about actions and weights and whatnot. I looked for a "Tesla" option and a "River Runs Through It" option but there were none.

I would happily pay for any of the 3.
 

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I don’t know the difference in performance, but it looks like the Path has a lifetime warranty on the rod, and the other two are only 1 year.

That alone would be the difference for me
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
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