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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I noticed that not all my arrows shot bullet wholes through paper. But flipping over the ones that didn't worked . then i turned the nock so the location bumb was out , and bingo . i check all my arrows this way . I use 4 - 2 '' blazer Vanes on my 32'' arrows . Now every arrow shoots perfect out of my Hoyt Nitrum 34 LD . :) getting the spine lined up close on each arrow , did make a difference in my 300 arrows . good way to check the stiff/heavy side.

 

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It's finding the crooked side of the arrow not the spine. The soap breaks up the surface tension of the water and the bent side will rotate down.

On straight shafts the nock placment can affect the outcome like you said because it wants to find the heavy side. The nocks aren't built perfectly ballanced because they have a tiny indexing tab and have the nock ears built a certain way and it's not perfectly round.

It's a good starting point but verify is always the final test. Getting all the arrows to tune bullet holes will improve your groups and broadhead flight.

I like to eliminate the nock part and test the arrow on a spine tester. It's basically finding the crooked side of the arrow and not really the spine. I also verify through paper and find 80% will tune perfect. Twist nock one way or another and it will also tune. The spine tester will also locate arrows that are mismatched in spine really good. Something soapy water cant do. I label these different and use them at close targets in 3d shoots where they are more likley to get ruined.

Nice video! It's good to see people spending time tunning their equipment.
 
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