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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I'm new to this forum and currently reside in Provo. I'm interested in finding some populations of Pinus edulis (Two-needle Pinyon pine) close to Provo to scout out some trees for research and possibly pine nut collecting. To anyone saavy with plant ID out here, does anyone know of some populations of Pinus edulis local, or somewhat close to Provo? I haven't done a lot of hiking around here--I wonder if anyone has seen these trees in one of the popular locations like rock canyon, squaw peak, etc?

I know this may not be the best place to ask--it appears a lot of this content has to do with fishing and hunting. Any suggestions of other forums specializing in Utah native plants?

Thanks!
 

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I would call the local BLM office.
 
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The East Tintic Mountains around Eureka and North of there have good populations on Colorado Pinyons. Last years pine nut crop kind of sucked, I assume because of the drought. We were still able to gather pine nuts but they were spread out more than in years past. You still have a few months before its time to gather them so you should have plenty of time to find some. Good luck.
 

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Best places I know are about 2 1/2 hours South of Provo. I have never noticed any on the East side of Utah Valley. A scattered few on the West side of Utah Lake and up Spanish Fork Canyon. Usually they are mixed in with junipers around Utah County.
 

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Take a drive out near Garrison Nevada. Tons of threes out there.
There is also a Garrison, Utah just across the line from Garrison, Nevada.

We were out there one year and there were so many nuts on the ground you didn't even have to get your hands all sticky. We picked up three or four 30 gallon garbage bags of them, that was before we decided to get back to deer hunting.

We were just outside of Indian Peaks WMA
 

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There is also a Garrison, Utah just across the line from Garrison, Nevada.

We were out there one year and there were so many nuts on the ground you didn't even have to get your hands all sticky. We picked up three or four 30 gallon garbage bags of them, that was before we decided to get back to deer hunting.

We were just outside of Indian Peaks WMA
20+ years ago, four of us would fill wool bags full of cones we picked and bring them back and sell them after the pains taking sticky labor was completed. I'm talking two 20' tandem axel utility trailers stacked 8' high with full bags of cones.
 

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It's a big business down there gathering cones. You'll find blue vinyl gloves all over the place from the collectors

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They are one of my favorite nut from when I was 4 or 5 years old and dad would pick them down on the Tintic district.

The problem with pine nuts is that they run in cycles and unless you stay on top of them you never know just where to go.

We picked a dozen gunnysacks full down south of Price on year only to have nothing but moths in the nuts. It was sad taking that whole load to the dump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Getting someone to tell you their Pine Nut hunting location will be more difficult than getting their honey hole. Be carefull around that Tintic area. Lots of mine shafts.
That's very good advice--I know of some researchers that grafted P. monophylla in the Eureka area and they didn't mention that. Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
They are one of my favorite nut from when I was 4 or 5 years old and dad would pick them down on the Tintic district.

The problem with pine nuts is that they run in cycles and unless you stay on top of them you never know just where to go.

We picked a dozen gunnysacks full down south of Price on year only to have nothing but moths in the nuts. It was sad taking that whole load to the dump.
Yes, it certainly is difficult. I have talked to a few pine nut farmers over the internet already and they have had terrible harvests this year.
 

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Yes, it certainly is difficult. I have talked to a few pine nut farmers over the internet already and they have had terrible harvests this year.
The harvest for this year won't happen until next fall, I don't know if I would call them farmers but rather gatherers since most of the cones and nuts are taken from public grounds.
 

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When there is a good harvest due to a good rainy year we pick them off the ground under the pine tree's right after the cones open and fall to the ground which is usually in mid September by the time we head back for the general buck hunt in October they most the cones are either dried up or still on the trees but the pine nuts are hollow and dry! 😡 you still find a few good ones on the floor but its time consuming to collect them however if you find a good area with lots of tree's and a good spot to do some glassing there is no worry about time! so you can gather up at least 1 pound or 2, the area we hunt is in Box Elder Unit near Yost lots of pinion tree's there. last year wasn't a good season so the places that had them for sale in Northern Utah was asking $22 to $ 25 a pound that is crazy! but people where buying them including me they make for a good snack during the winter months and also taste good in Christmas cookies $18 per pound is was the average price the recent years.
 

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Well the "Pinion" Pine nut harvest is in effect! and the price per pound is the highest I ever seen it.. Saccos in Roy has them for $ 21.00 per pound, however they make a good winter snack so I will be paying the price!
 

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At that price you can fill up the old truck and head out to the Southwest Desert and gather up a couple of gunny sacks full.

We did it a few years ago and picked them up off of the ground, no cones at all. Then floated them to find the bad ones. In the end we ended up with around 40 lbs of them divided up 3 ways.
 

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Definitely! the way to do it Critter ... just wish I had the time and knew the South area better mostly everything I do outdoors is down North.
 
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