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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The latest thing to pull behind a bubble. A Pistol Pete.
It's a streamer like a woolly bugger with a bead and a propeller in front.
I have watched people using them with some good success.
A few weeks ago, I met a man that was using some of them that he made, and he was nailing the trout at a community pond.
I picked up some of the propeller blades at Sportsman's Warehouse and tied a few woolly buggers with them. Green and Black were the colors I used.
I was pleasantly surprised at the results.
You can buy Pistol Petes' ready to use at Wal-Mart, or like me, make some of your own.
They work great behind a water bubble.
I don't know whether to call them a fly or a spinner?
 

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I would call them a fly with a propeller on the front :wink:

Have heard of them, never tried one, probably never will..... not with a fly rod anyway. I hear they work great but I guess I'm too elitest to stoop so low...
 

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ScottyP said:
I would call them a fly with a propeller on the front :wink:

Have heard of them, never tried one, probably never will..... not with a fly rod anyway. I hear they work great but I guess I'm too elitest to stoop so low...
Come on Scotty, you should at least throw some corn on those flies or smear them in Velvetta.
 

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Yeah I caught a whole bunch at Yankee Meadows this summer on it. Only had one and I only stopped using it when it got bent in half. Worked good for me other places too.
 

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Nibble Nuts said:
ScottyP said:
I would call them a fly with a propeller on the front :wink:

Have heard of them, never tried one, probably never will..... not with a fly rod anyway. I hear they work great but I guess I'm too elitest to stoop so low...
Come on Scotty, you should at least throw some corn on those flies or smear them in Velvetta.
Corn fly? You may be onto something.... I'll call it a 'globug'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
ScottyP, you got me thinking.
At what point is a new fly acceptable to the "elitist."
Beadhead nymphs are not accepted by some and nymphs in general are not acceptable to the dry fly elitists.
How long must a fly be around before it's accepted by the elitist?
Now I'm not picking on you here, but I do wonder what makes a fly acceptable to each of us?
As for me, if it catches fish, I'm all over it!
 

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I have had this conversation many times and I certainly use tackle and techniques that are frowned on by other fly fishermen just as I choose not to use some tactics myself. My standards are what I find sporting and acceptible to me and me only. I do nymph, use indicators, tie and use beadhead flies, and tie and use flies that have synthetic materials. I do not use baloons as indicators, I shy away from floro tippet material (it never breaks down), I never scent my flies, and I don't use or tie flies that incorporate a rappala style lip or a spinning blade. These things could be argued and hashed out again and again. Basically, these things are what we as the individual angler have to decide for ourselves. When I am fly fishing, I don't want to use flies that attract fish with action that doesn't come from me and the way I am working the fly-- like spinner blades and scents. That is just how I see it and those are the 'rules' I have designated for fly fishing. Those rules obviously change when I ice fish or fish plastics and gear with spin tackle (yeah, I still go slumming from time to time).
 

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I have used this "lure" or "fly" numerous times. But I find it more appealing to fisherman than fish. In the early 70s it was common in sporting goods stores in the midwest and south, advertised as a hot bluegill fly. For me it was clunky to cast, twisted the leader and scared the bluegills away. I did catch a few crappies on it in white with a silver prop.

Best I can remember you could buy it here in Evanston in the 80s. In Wyoming trout would greet the contraption with a smirk, or sometimes a wide grin. But I found Arctic Grayling liked them in black and gold, fished super slow on the bottom.

We called them a "whirligig", among other things.

I no longer use the thing; could never keep the prop rolling and I just had better lures or flies. Hope they have improved them and you all have luck with them. I believe "Variety is the spice of life"; experimenting with new and different fishing methods is cool.
 
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