Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay fellow ice fishers we've been using the ole manual auger. Works okay on thinner ice and if you find a previous ice hole. However, for thicker ice us to old gals find the manual auger a lot of work since we don't have the upper body strength and/or muscle. Here's what we'd like...an auger thats lightweight, drills an 8" hole, and within a price range of $250-$350. Sooooo...What power auger would you recommend and why??? :wink: :wink:

PS...Anyone recently upgrade to a newer power auger who wants to part with their old one please PM and provide specifics on the one you'd part with and at what price. :wink:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,434 Posts
I have an 8" Eskimo. I drills holes OK, when it feels like starting. It's not too heavy, but the tool box, welding machine, air compressor and parts I carry to keep it running are tiresome to drag out on the ice.

I would recommend sleeping in, then go out on the ice late and offer someone $5 or a sixpack of beer to drill ya some holes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
We was at Hunnington today and you couldn't pay me enough money to drill holes in the ice with the hand auger (And I'm a younger guy). I think they're all comparible, I'de make your decision on $$$ and weight of the auger. I would not buy a used auger. They won't be much more new and if you buy a used one and have problems with it you'll be well into it what a new one would cost.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
Power augers will start to go on sale now.
Watch for clearance sales at places like Sportsman's Warehouse.
There has been a lot of debate as to which brand auger is best.
They all do the job and the newer Eskimo augers have the same motors as the Strikemasters do now.
The cheeper power augers are good, but they are a little slower because of the smaller motors.
The biggest problem with power augers is the lack of maintance.
Always use a fuel stabelizer with the fuel and at the end of the season, run the auger out of gas. Start the new season with fresh fuel and stabelizer added. Keep a spare spark plug and wrench with the auger when in use. Let it warm up before drilling, and keep the blade cover on the blades when not drilling. Never use the auger to bang on the ice to test it or to open holes. This will ruin the blades.
Don't pull the starting rope all the way out when starting the auger. Use short quick pulls so the knot on the end of the rope inside the power head isn't dammaged.
Used augers usually need repairs and thats why they are for sale. I would buy new. It could save you some money, and new augers have a warenty.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,434 Posts
I change spark plugs every year.
I change the fuel pump diaphragm every year.
I drain the gas tank every year.
I run the motor till the carb is out of gas and the engine quits before I put the drill away - every year.
I use fuel stabilizer.

It's not all that bad. I'm on my second auger since 1977, neither one of which would start for me new out of the box. It's just me, I could break a bowling ball.

My first auger was a Herter's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Grandpa D said:
Power augers will start to go on sale now.
Watch for clearance sales at places like Sportsman's Warehouse.
There has been a lot of debate as to which brand auger is best.
They all do the job and the newer Eskimo augers have the same motors as the Strikemasters do now.
The cheeper power augers are good, but they are a little slower because of the smaller motors.
The biggest problem with power augers is the lack of maintance.
Always use a fuel stabelizer with the fuel and at the end of the season, run the auger out of gas. Start the new season with fresh fuel and stabelizer added. Keep a spare spark plug and wrench with the auger when in use. Let it warm up before drilling, and keep the blade cover on the blades when not drilling. Never use the auger to bang on the ice to test it or to open holes. This will ruin the blades.
Don't pull the starting rope all the way out when starting the auger. Use short quick pulls so the knot on the end of the rope inside the power head isn't dammaged.
Used augers usually need repairs and thats why they are for sale. I would buy new. It could save you some money, and new augers have a warenty.
And be sure to check that the bolt connecting the auger to the motor is tight every time you use it, So you don't end up like me ( I just lost mine at causey today ) DUH :shock: :( :( :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
A lot of guys who have power augers think that is all they need....Power....Let me tell you guys...change the blades every year. They get dull just like hand augers do. So, next time you are on the ice, listen to the time it takes a guy with a power auger to drill through 5 inches of ice...you can do it in 2 minutes or less, but he will be powering for 3 or more minutes. Plus, when you watch him "set up" for the drilling process, he will normally 'bang' the blades on the ice...ouch..... before he starts. I quess it's a normal thing for someone with the money to spend.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hey all thanks for the power auger advise....we'll most likely buy new. With this being our first ice fish'n season we've already dropped a small fortune into the basic ice fish'n necessities...Cranking on a manual auger builds character and who can resist getting exercise and breathing/sucking in all that fresh air then getting light headed after you've punched through the ice...right??? We both take turns and have turned the auger together. Ahhhhhh yes, the experience of being in the great outdoors on frozen H2O in quest of a fish. It's the next day and several doses of the good old standby vitamin "M" aka 800mg Motrin (which we have stock in) that makes us appreciate the manual auger even more. As you can see we're now becoming attached to it...Again thanks fellow fishers and may the bite be on for you wherever you wet the line.... :wink: :wink:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,931 Posts
A manual auger should cut up to 10" of ice fairly easy. If not, the blades may be dull.
The blades should be very sharp to the touch and make sure that the bolts holding the blades to the auger are tight.
If your hand auger is over 2 years old, it may need new blades.
As has already been mentioned, use 2 people at a time with the hand auger and it will cut faster with less individual effort.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
fatbass said:
It takes special tools to hold the correct angle through the partial helix.
Hmmmmm....."special tools....the partial helix." :shock: OMG Sounds like something I don't want to venture into. Especially at my age...... :lol: -*|*- :wink: :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
I spent many years ice fishing in Minnesota where you need extensions on augers to even get through the ice, and my vote goes to Strikemaster, hands down. If you go with the 8", you need the most power you can afford. Incidentally, I've been to lakes in northern Minnesota twice when I got to the limits of my auger and had to go home because I couldn't get through- the ice was 4' thick! :shock:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,698 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
fatbass said:
After inspecting my auger, it's actually a partial torus, not a helix. _(O)_ *\-\*
Oh my my...oh dear you can bet I've duly noted the partial torus..... :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top