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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a reloading question for you guys. Been working up a load for my new 270WSM. Using 140gr Accubond and Magpro powder. 72.5gr of powder seem to shoot the best and I am still a couple grains below the Max load. What I have noticed though is the amo is getting very hard to chamber in my rifle, it is getting hard to close the bolt all the way. I am on the third time reloading of this batch brass. Even after I full length resize the cases they are hard to chamber. I checked my brass length and it is in spec. Is the a sign of high pressure or am I not resizing the cases right?

Mark
 

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I would see if you can find somone with a resizing dies that you could use to see if it is your resizing die.
Second I would make sure I cleaned all the lube off the cases prior to reloading. This can cause them to stick.

Third check your overall length of the load. Your case may be the right size but if your not seating your bullet deep enough you may be pushing it into your rifling trying to get to chamber. This is especially important on larger grain bullets as they will engage the riflings sooner than a lighter grain bullet seated at the same depth. You could try and chamber a dead round with a bullet loosely inserted into the casing. Take it out and measure the length. If it is shorter than what you are seating to this is probably your problem.

Fourth and maybe this should be your first check is that you are not using to much pressure on the seating/crimp die. Most seating dies are roll crimp dies, if you press to hard it can cause your case to deform. You only need enough pressure to apply about 15 to 20 lbs of force to roll crimp. After that you can cause what was a good casing prior to this operation to be out of round. This being a shorter round you are likely in the bottom of the reloading handle stroke and you don't even realize the force you are applying.

That is where I would start.
 

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You know, my buddy has been having the same issue. He reloads tons of different calibers, but he has been having a real hard time with his .270 WSM too. In fact, he planned to take this rifle on the deer hunt but took another because there wasn't enough time to load another batch.
 

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I would recheck your dies to see if they are set up properly. this could be a case of insufficient resizing. Insufficient resizing is the result of improper die adjustment in the vast majority of cases. Of all resizing problems, insufficient resizing is the easiest to identify, since you will not be able to chamber the reloaded cartridge. In most instances, this can be corrected by readjusting the sizing die according to the instructions given under the heading of Full Length Sizing.
 

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what they said

do you trim your cases? the WSM and WSSM grow alot.

more than likely it is overall length. quick troubleshoot. take a blue or red sharpie maker and paint the whole bullet, to the neck. load it close the bolt.
eject the round and look for signs of the bullet touching the lans and grooves. if there are marks in the (paint) it is overall length or case legnth

if it comes out clean, it is resizing issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the advise. I figured out the problem, i wasn't pushing the shoulder back enough. I turned my sizing die in about an 1/8 of a turn more and problem solved. Now they chamber no problem.

Mark
 

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To full length resize, the shell holder should touch the die when it is up. Screw the die in until the shell holder touches the die, then half a turn more. Since the casing is tapered, it has to go all the way in or it doesn't size the case at all, except for the neck.

Carefully check for signs of over pressure. Depending on the powder, 270 cal cartridges tend to go into excessive pressure really easy. I would suggest a slow burning powder like 4831.

Have a great day!
 

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I have had the same problem with my 300 RUM. When I was seating the bullet, I was pulling the lever down hard, figuring that it was seating it the same way evertime. I was changing the shoulder by doing this.
 

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400bullelk said:
I have had the same problem with my 300 RUM. When I was seating the bullet, I was pulling the lever down hard, figuring that it was seating it the same way evertime. I was changing the shoulder by doing this.
Changing the shoulder in the seating die? Many rifle seating dies do not have a crimping ring. It is a crimping ring that can give you problens when seating bullets if your dies are not properly adjusted for the right crimp, or if your casings vary in length. Does your seating die have a crimping ring? If not, it will be pretty hard to change the angle of the shoulder in the seating die.

Run a brass that has been sized but not primed or loaded with powder all the way up in to the die. If it will go all the way till the shell holder hits the die with out any resistance, there is no crimping ring. If you feel some resistance just before the shell holder hits the die, then you most likely have a crimping ring. If you have a crimping ring, you need to pay special attention to getting the die adjusted properly to give the right amount of crimp. Otherwise you can have problems.

If you have a crimping ring in the die and don't want to crimp, just back the die out until the brass doesn't hit the crimp ring, then adjust your punch to seat the bullet to the proper
cartridge over all length. You will want to make these adjustments with the press at the
maximum up position. When you are seating bullets with these adjustments, there will be no resistance except for the minimal resistance of the bullet being pushed into the neck.

The only rifle cartridge I have crimped is the 30-30. These required a crimp because of the type of magazine on the mod 94 and others where the bullets are in line and the recoil on the whole stack could push your bullets deeper. If you want uniform crimps it is necessary to have your brass all the same length. Putting a crimp on a bullet without a crimping ring is a pain anyway. You have to put a little pressure on the brass and actually re-shape the bullet a bit by forcing the brass into it a little. Too much pressure and you may buckle the brass of the neck. Some bullets designed for the 30-30 had a ring for the crimp. That made life much easier.

Its a great hobby, but please read the books, and the papers that come with die sets and pay attention to detail. Be safe!
 
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