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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was thinking today about how much archery has evolved and changed not only in equipment, but "theories" of how to hunt. Some of the things we used to believe or tried to sell are interesting to think about. For instance, I started shooting archery before the days of compound bows. The theory then was that a pass thru shot was not a desired shot. Lower poundage bows were used with the intentions of keeping the arrow inside the animal so as it ran off, the broad head would continue to cut and do more damage, eventually killing the animal.

I thought it would be fun to bring up some of the old things that were taught and believed but weren't necessarily true. Here are a couple more that I remember:

People only shoot replaceable blade broad heads because they are too lazy or don't know how to sharpen a cut on contact blade.

Replaceable blade broad heads need to be outlawed because they don't penetrate as well as a cut on contact blade. It takes 9 lbs of pressure for a cut on contact blade to penetrate a green hide, and upwards of 27 lbs or more for a conical head to penetrate the same green hide. Based upon this information, advocates of the cut on contact blades tried to sell the idea that a c.o.c. blade would penetrate up to 3 times deeper than a replaceable blade broad head. Although they do penetrate better, the myth was the "3 times" better.

Carbon arrows used to have cautions / warnings that were posted on the shaft box warning the users that carbon fiber splinters could be left in the animal and if eaten, would cause a health hazard.

Anyone remember others that they would like to share?
 

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I remember back when the bowhunt wasn't as crowded as the rifle deer hunt. Back when other hunters would give you your space when they figured out someone else beat them in to "their spot". I remember back when hunting wasn't about killing a big deer mostly for the purpose of social media fame. I remember back before everyone was all on separate "teams" and we were all on one team together as "hunters". I remember back
When everyone didn't feel entitled to every big buck on the mountain and didn't purposely ruin other stalks for people, just so they could possibly have a chance at them on a later date. I remember when fish and game actually cared about the 'OUTCOME' of our deer and elk herds and not the 'INCOME' that it generates for them. I remember when our field officers were all our friends and not so quick on the draw with the ticket book. I remember when everyone would wear whatever camo they had laying around and wasn't worried about lookin "cool" and making sure their camo was in style. I remember when a bow was a hunting tool and not a fashion accessory. And I remember a time where if you used the term "summit swag", people thought that's what it was called when you finally hit the top of the mountain... My how times have changed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Remember when AMO was the standard for measuring a bow, 8 inch brace height was the norm, everyone used 4 fletch arrows, 5 inch fletch was the standard size, you were called unethical if you shot an arrow with only 2 or 3 cutting blades and dacron was what strings were made of.
 

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While bowhunting has certainly evolved, I think it's safe to say that we're as full of baloney today as we ever were - just a lot more affluent. But I remember when...

...attractant scents were absolutely essential. We all reeked of rotten apples and stale urine.

...camo was military issue (and green) and was likewise essential.

...those new-fangled "compound" bows weren't considered to be real bows. Many thought they should be banned.

...the most productive hunting strategy was the "drive".

...there were no TV shows except "The American Sportsman" and that program rarely featured bowhunts. But there was a film tour that came through town each year and we all gathered at the ward house gymnasium to watch it.

...women weren't welcome on the bowhunt (for reasons so stupid that I'm embarrassed to admit that I ever believed them). My mom was an avid deer hunter who never missed a rifle hunt, but she never got to go on a bowhunt and I feel bad about that.
 
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I remember check adams saying you need to have your face and back of hands completely painted over otherwise you were going to get spotted.

I also remember the keep the arrow in the animal theory...

most used military surplus camo rather than the fashion trend stuff we use today.

shooting with fingers was better for hunting cause a release can fail and a bow could be shot very quickly with fingers.
 

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I remember open quivers with exposed broadheads. I also remember when Zwickeys and Bear Razorheads were pretty much the only game in town for broadhead choices, though Satellite, Muzzy and Wasp were getting popular quickly. I used to drool over their adds in Bow & Arrow Hunting magazine. Back then, all broadheads were BIG and that was considered advantageous--now everything is small, short, sleek, or expandable.

I also remember when hunting stabilizers were short, treebark camo was the most amazing stuff available, and the only elk calls were mouth diaphragms or home made.

Oh, one more thing--my first rangefinder was a little plastic box that you looked through and determined distance by placing the deer's brisket between two lines. I still have that, too. :)
 

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Oh, one more thing--my first rangefinder was a little plastic box that you looked through and determined distance by placing the deer's brisket between two lines. I still have that, too. :)
I still have one that is still attached to my first compound bow.

How about the range finders that you had to use the dial on and when two yellow dots aligned you had to look at the dial on the wheel?
 

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A couple of additional reflections--I remember the first time I saw an Oneida recurve/compound hybrid. I wanted one sooo bad. I still think they look awesome.

As far as strategy and hunting methods, it seems like archery hunting was about getting closer and not being able to shoot farther (though I personally don't have anything against people taking longer shots given the proper circumstances and skill).

Also, hunting back then seemed a little more laid back--everything seems pretty hardcore, intense, and competitive nowadays.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Remember when you set the tiller on a bow, you would set it about 1/8 inch different for the upper limb than the lower limb. I haven't played with tiller for years, although I do use it for a different purpose (tiller tuning) than we used to.

How about when Muzzy Broad Heads first came out, they fast became the standard for broad heads, and were the most expensive heads you could buy, 6 heads for $29. They haven't changed their design in years and still sell for about the same price and still get 6 in a package.

Before bows were made with a window cutout, you had to purchase arrows that extended beyond the front of the bow by 1 inch. Then we came out with the overdraw system and arrows got much shorter and began to be pulled well past the front of the bow.

Remember the old "springy" rest?

How about the first single cam bow... made by Martin.

Beman had an electronic device you put in the arrow so you could locate the arrow or game animal when lost.

Then there was the tracking string that fastened to the arrow to so you could track a shot animal by following the string. That one disappeared after pass thru shots became the goal.
 

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I do remember treebark and still have some of it. :) and yes broad heads were huge back then.

I remember scented wafers that were strapped to the bottom of the boot.
 

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The GOOD OLE DAYS **** sure were the GOOD OLE DAYS.Statewide Archery Tags 5.00
Dozen Port Cedar Arrows with a Dozen MA3L Broadheads 4.98 Grand Central Market 9th south and State Street Salt Lake. one dozen Bear Razors with inserts 5.98. World War 2 Marine Camo Tops And Bottoms. 5.99 Army and Navy store State Street and 150 south,first recurve Wolfs sporting goods store Mercury Hunter 28.00 Had to put it on layaway.Gas for my 1954 half ton chevy truck 27.9 a gallon.To top it off I started hunting the Phavant . More Deer than I've ever seen in my life. Here's the topper>I seen 4 other hunters in 5 days.I was young> I was Strong>Couldn't shoot worth a ****> Still Can't ..Just Bow hunting> not so much in killin something.But to be out with the guys you graduated high school with 1963. Now most of them are gone, taken by the Viet Nam war> Sickness> Drugs>and self inflected things>They were the GOOD OLE DAYS.. The ones now with my wife of 51 years>> My 2 Sons> My 2 Grand Sons> Now my Great Grand Son and a Great Grand daughter on the way.These are the GOOD OLE DAYS NOW>But I would give my left one to go back just one more day to hunt in 1964))------------>>:D:sad::)
 

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I remember when you could get two buck tags, one for the archery and one for the rifle. Over the counter, no draws.:shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Old Fudd... good post. I am about 10 years your junior. I think about how much time I have left before I have to hang up the bow. I agree with your comment about the good old days being with your wife. I too enjoy the time spent with my wife of 40 years. Just need to discover a way to spend more time.

I remember traveling to Canada in 72 and in horror when we had to pay $.50 a gallon for gas when it was $.35 a gal in the States.

I also remember the MA3 broad heads. Never used one on a big game animal, just carp. Did use the Bear Razors several times and then switched to the Satellite's because of the ease of sharpening, or rather not having to sharpen.

Thanks for the memories.
 

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The GOOD OLE DAYS **** sure were the GOOD OLE DAYS.Statewide Archery Tags 5.00
Dozen Port Cedar Arrows with a Dozen MA3L Broadheads 4.98 Grand Central Market 9th south and State Street Salt Lake. one dozen Bear Razors with inserts 5.98. World War 2 Marine Camo Tops And Bottoms. 5.99 Army and Navy store State Street and 150 south,first recurve Wolfs sporting goods store Mercury Hunter 28.00 Had to put it on layaway.Gas for my 1954 half ton chevy truck 27.9 a gallon.To top it off I started hunting the Phavant . More Deer than I've ever seen in my life. Here's the topper>I seen 4 other hunters in 5 days.I was young> I was Strong>Couldn't shoot worth a ****> Still Can't ..Just Bow hunting> not so much in killin something.But to be out with the guys you graduated high school with 1963. Now most of them are gone, taken by the Viet Nam war> Sickness> Drugs>and self inflected things>They were the GOOD OLE DAYS.. The ones now with my wife of 51 years>> My 2 Sons> My 2 Grand Sons> Now my Great Grand Son and a Great Grand daughter on the way.These are the GOOD OLE DAYS NOW>But I would give my left one to go back just one more day to hunt in 1964))------------>>:D:sad::)
Just one? Not much of a hunter, are ya! :D
 

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Remember when ya would start to puke from nerves the night before the Archery hunt Started.. All the Big Bucks you had seen scouting. Couldn't sleep. Toss and Turn OMG! Then around noon on the opener,, you crashed and fell asleep on the hill side.. Do I love to hunt?? ))--------------->>Best Time you will ever have with your britches on!!:grin: going to miss my Bow Hunt real bad one day..
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Remember when the archery deer hunt would end and then the archery Elk hunt would start. I think they overlapped a day or two. Any who, there would be few deer hunters around, with very little competition and when the deer hunt ended and the elk hunt began, you could drive for miles and never see another hunter.
 

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I remember when every hunter you would meet and talk to was more or less a stand up guy and seemed to "get it" and hunted to hunt. That is not how I perceive things now. I miss the separate elk archery! I remember when it was about getting close and helping your buddies fill a tag, and not really being too crowded on a hunt. Buying your tag at Smiths as you grabbed your groceries on the way out of town was sure nice, getting a tag was the least of your worries. All being said I still get the same feelings of gratitude appreciation and excitement every time I set foot on the mountain. That will never change. Keep your nose to the wind and watch your top knot gentlemen.

Cheddar
 
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