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Here is some easy reading about sage grouse in the west:



Both of these articles highlight the lynchpin of diminishing habitat (shocker)! Hopefully sage grouse won't become another species who fall victim to mankind's unquenchable thirst for power and money.
 

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Here is some easy reading about sage grouse in the west:



Both of these articles highlight the lynchpin of diminishing habitat (shocker)! Hopefully sage grouse won't become another species who fall victim to mankind's unquenchable thirst for power and money.
It feels like a lot of non-migratory wild bird populations are on the wane recently in the west due to terrible weather. The sage grouse is certainly in a lot of trouble, and a good indicator of where we may be going with other wildlife who use the same range. Mule deer aren’t in great shape and have not been trending in the right direction for a while. I remember a comparison of their populations like a roller coaster, sure there are highs, and ups and downs but the overall trend is a leveling out in the end until the roller coaster drops out and comes to a stop.

There’s many things adding to the demise of western landscapes. Among them are climate change, energy development, housing development, invasive plant species, long term droughts, far greater pressure for recreational purposes on our landscapes.

Now whether or not some of you agree climate change is a pressing issue, especially in areas that receive such little moisture to begin with. I was listening to a conversation that included Ben Shapiro in it in regards to climate change a few weeks ago. In it he agrees climate change is happening, and even that we are a cause of it. His argument is not that it’s happening, but that humans will adapt. Mule deer and sage grouse were the first things to come to my mind when he said that, and all I could think yes, but there’s plenty of species who won’t adapt to a changing climate. 4-5 degrees Celsius over the next 100 years is a massive change that will result in devastating consequences to wildlife and wild places. It’s true humans can adapt to those changes, but many wildlife species won’t be able to.

I do wonder if the bird gets listed in the coming years on the ESA. The conversation is undoubtably coming. Hunters and anglers are conservationists, and the amount of minimizing and ignoring, or straight out denying of things that will be extremely detrimental to wildlife going forward is sad to me at times. “Green energy“ isn’t perfect either, and we have to choose the right places to produce “green energy”. But we need to start more aggressively attacking the issues that impact our wildlife so heavily.
 

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In one article, sage grouse are called the "indicator species" - quoting from said article:

"Since the sage grouse is an indicator species, their declines signal that the sagebrush ecosystem is also in peril. This habitat loss in turn impacts other species, such as mule deer, elk, pronghorn antelope, pygmy rabbits, and a host of reptiles and songbirds. Yet, on a wider scale, in recent years the sage grouse has also been an indicator of our internal relationships as a nation, as the rural-urban divide widens."

The older I get the more and more fascinated I become with the world around us, and the animals which call this world home. We live in a pretty remarkable time in the history of the world! I wish I could turn the clock back 15 years and chose a different profession!
 

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In one article, sage grouse are called the "indicator species" - quoting from said article:

"Since the sage grouse is an indicator species, their declines signal that the sagebrush ecosystem is also in peril. This habitat loss in turn impacts other species, such as mule deer, elk, pronghorn antelope, pygmy rabbits, and a host of reptiles and songbirds. Yet, on a wider scale, in recent years the sage grouse has also been an indicator of our internal relationships as a nation, as the rural-urban divide widens."

The older I get the more and more fascinated I become with the world around us, and the animals which call this world home. We live in a pretty remarkable time in the history of the world! I wish I could turn the clock back 15 years and chose a different profession!
Agreed, I’m quite worried for sage grouse and mule deer especially going forward. Between hotter temps, and cheat grass impacting fire cycles, the future does not look all that bright on the sage brush sea. I don’t know what the exact answers are, and I don’t think any of our policy makers are making a productive difference at the moment, but action needs to be taken, soon and fast.
 

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Here’s a good map of the past 30 years. These trends simply can’t continue. Hotter and drier is not going to bode well for the state or our wildlife. These trends will impact places like Utah in even bigger ways than a lot of places due to us already being the 2nd driest state in the nation to begin with. As I mentioned in the winter thread, I’ve never seen some of our lakes and reservoirs in worse shape heading into this summer.

 

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I've seen more sage grouse in the past 4 years than my entire life combined. Utah, Wyoming... I run across flocks in places I've never previously ever seen sage grouse. Some areas I've hunted, grouse have replaced the chuckar, one "honey hole" I used to hunt chuckar in, I havent seen a single bird in 8 years... always holds a bunch of sage grouse though.

-DallanC
 

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The subject itself is intensely interesting and definitely pertinent to the other game species we all love. The problem in studying about it though comes when the sage grouse becomes a "symbol" as it has, and partisan zealots on each side cloud the facts of the situation with their extreme hyperbole that can obscure where things really stand.
 

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I've seen more sage grouse in the past 4 years than my entire life combined. Utah, Wyoming... I run across flocks in places I've never previously ever seen sage grouse. Some areas I've hunted, grouse have replaced the chuckar, one "honey hole" I used to hunt chuckar in, I havent seen a single bird in 8 years... always holds a bunch of sage grouse though.

-DallanC
I’ve seen far less upland game, including sage grouse. These are anecdotal. Range qualities are generally trending down, as are sage grouse populations. I think this year has a chance of being exceptionally bad on upland birds.
 

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The subject itself is intensely interesting and definitely pertinent to the other game species we all love. The problem in studying about it though comes when the sage grouse becomes a "symbol" as it has, and partisan zealots on each side cloud the facts of the situation with their extreme hyperbole that can obscure where things really stand.
Agreed, it’s why people within their own perspective sides need to push for the best policy for wildlife and us, instead of walking a partisan line the party has laid out in its platform. There’s no sincerity in politics or policies anymore.
 
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