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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey i've got a question for y'all-

I have inherited an older Winchester Model 94 30-30 from my grandpa and am just curious what your opinions are about mounting a scope on it. First of all, is it even possible. I don't have it in front of my right now but to my recollection, doesn't it eject the brass upward? If so i can see how it wouldn't be possible to mount a scope. The other part of whether its possible or not, is do they have grooves to mount the rings on the receiver or not? Second, if it were up to you, would you mount a scope, or just leave it as is and use the iron sights? I know that the ballistics of a 30-30 don't really allow for accurate shots longer than 200 yards or so. So i'm thinking maybe it would be best just to leave it alone. Comments would be appreciated.
 

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Yes it is possible. I do not have one on mine but I have seen them on a few freinds. I am not absolutely positive how but, I think there is a a bracket you can buy and either mount it yourself or have a gunny do it. It mounts to the side of the action and is L shaped to go over the top of the ejection port. The shells tend to eject a little to the right on mine. I have never seen any problems with ejection when my freind is cycling his action.

I personally would not and wont put one on mine. I don't think it needs it. But, its all in what you are comfortable with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
See this is what i'm thinking also. As nice as it is to have the accuracy of a scoped rifle, i think the 94 needs nothing more than a lot of good practice. Last time i shot it i was hitting or coming within 2 inches of clay pigeons at about 150 yards. I guess its more about putting an efficient stalk on the deer so you know you'll make an accurate shot and not need the scope.
 

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I would first ask a bigger question or two. Do you have other hunting rifles you use? Is this more important as an heirloom from your Grandpa, or as a hunting rifle?

If you have another hunting rifle with a scope, it might be good to just keep the open sights. There are conditions where an open sight rifle is preferable - and it would be nice to have one around in the truck when you go so you have a couple of options. If it is more heirloom, then hang it above the fireplace or in your "man room" with a picture of Grandpa next to it.

If you are dead set on putting a scope on it, it is possible. I've seen one done that has a machined metal plate, that curves up and under the scope, so as the empties are ejected out the top, they will deflect to the right instead of clanking on the scope. Since you are asking the question of if its possible, I would guess you are not a gunsmith. Neither am I so I would be asking the same thing. Knowing that, and my own lack of skills in that world, I would for sure take it to a gunsmith for their expertise. Good luck on stuff. Lots of deer have been killed with the old '94 30-30.
 

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There is something to be said for versatility, but in my mind the beauty and advantage of certain guns is built into the form. For example, you can get little chamber inserts for a 12 guage shotgun so that it will shoot 20 or 28 guage shells. I'm not sure why you would do this, because the whole reason to have a 20 or 28 guage is to take advantage of the small, light, fast-pointing character of those sizes. I think the appeal of a lever action is the simplicity and quick sight picture it offers "naked." It's a great still-hunting and woods rifle for ranges out to 150 yards or so. Grab a bolt action with more aerodynamic bullets and a scope if you want long range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah i'm thinking I'll just leave the 30-30 alone. I wouldn't ever go so far as to have a gunsmith drill holes in it or do something to permanently alter the firearm. I do have another rifle, but because of its weight alone i don't think i could ever pack it through the woods or up mountain sides. Its an older winchester model 70 in .243. It has the super heavy barrel and is scoped already. I would like to put a newer scope on it. Any suggestions? This would be more of a varmint gun. Oh- one other question- Back in the day when my grandpa was younger he carved out a "decorative" diamond shaped recess in the stock of the 30-30, and inserted a piece of red and white plastic. I'd really like to pull it out, fill it in with wood, and restore the whole stock, forearm and everything. The bluing is still good, there is no corrosion, i just hate that cheap looking plastic. How would i go about this?
 

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You might check around at some pawn shops for another one with wood that hasn't been carved up like that and swap it out.

On the flip side, I have an old pump 12 gauge that belonged to my great grandfather, and has been passed down through four generations to me. The stock was cracked long ago an was mended the same day with a roll of electical tape. There is an old slip on leather recoil pad that is ugly as sin. I thought about redoing the wood on it, getting rid of the tape, and losing the leather pad. Then I reconsidered - that is what makes the gun so interesting to me. Granted, I don't use the gun - it is for display only anymore as it is now over 100 years old. But sometimes, the ugly quirky stuff is what gives the gun more character.
 

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GaryFish said:
I would first ask a bigger question or two. Do you have other hunting rifles you use? Is this more important as an heirloom from your Grandpa, or as a hunting rifle?

If you have another hunting rifle with a scope, it might be good to just keep the open sights. There are conditions where an open sight rifle is preferable - and it would be nice to have one around in the truck when you go so you have a couple of options. If it is more heirloom, then hang it above the fireplace or in your "man room" with a picture of Grandpa next to it.

If you are dead set on putting a scope on it, it is possible. I've seen one done that has a machined metal plate, that curves up and under the scope, so as the empties are ejected out the top, they will deflect to the right instead of clanking on the scope. Since you are asking the question of if its possible, I would guess you are not a gunsmith. Neither am I so I would be asking the same thing. Knowing that, and my own lack of skills in that world, I would for sure take it to a gunsmith for their expertise. Good luck on stuff. Lots of deer have been killed with the old '94 30-30.
I rarely agree with your opinions, but this time I do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'll take a picture of it next time I go to my parent's house. The pattern is pretty lame. I'd much rather have it restored. i think you'd agree after you see it
 

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I would not scope your particular Model 94. But there is one sight upgrade option you might consider that does not detract from value or historical correctness yet usually provides more accuracy once you get the hang of it and puts you a step ahead as a true "gun nut".
That would be to install a "peep" or aperture type sight on it. This was a common upgrade for these guns (my dad did it to his 94). This increases accuracy over the buckhorn style open sight because of a better sight picture and longer sight radius.
You have two types to choose from (see http://www.lymanproducts.com/lymanproducts/index.htm for more info):
1) The Receiver type that goes in the Win 94's pre-drilled/tapped holes in the rear left side of the receiver to accept this type sight. The Lyman 66 adjustable version is The classic type of this kind. You will find the larger "hunting" aperture best. This type is rugged and a good match for a classic hunting rifle. Not cheap, but a classic well-made adjustable American product. This would be my preferred sight for your usage.


2) The Tang type that hearkens back to the buffalo hunters and target shooters of the past (or "Quigley Down Under" for you newbies!) The most accurate of the type, it is a bit more fragile but definitely ratchets up the "cool" factor. You should have pre-drilled/tapped holes on the tang for this type. Classic Lyman #2 Tang sight shown:
 
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