Utah Wildlife Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody hunted the release areas near Otter Creek? Any recommendations?

I haven't been over there in years but my wife and I are doing a quick retreat before her pregnancy gets too far along. Going to do some fly fishing but also hoping to bring along the over under.

Can't wait, this will only be my second time out for upland this year. I need a day in the field.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,237 Posts
All I will say is that some buddies and I were down there for another hunt a few years ago and stopped by the river to fish. This rooster (obviously pen raised) basically came up to us and we fed it nightcrawlers. I doubt it had much of a long term survival there.

So my suggestion, is, uh, bring bait? -Ov-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Sounds similar to Cedar. We've had to kick them away from us in the past.

Not very sporting but the dinner tastes just as good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
Pen raised birds...…..Huh, and some folks complain about high fence big game hunting. What's the difference? One has wings and the other has fur.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would be fine with the state ending the practice but I'll shoot the invasive species until they do. Keeps me active and puts food on the table. But I'd be fine with the DWR using monies for another species or project.

I'd much prefer l lived closer to S. Dakota. I'd really love doing a pheasant hunt there with my dad in the near future. I know he really enjoyed the midwest hunts as a kid.

Until then....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Pen raised birds...…..Huh, and some folks complain about high fence big game hunting. What's the difference? One has wings and the other has fur.
Birds fly over fences.

High fence (killed in pen) is the most pathetic excuse for hunting. CWD, Impure genetics, petri dish other diseases.

I'd rather hunt a free range Jack Rabbit than kills 400' high fence Elk.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pheasants are invasive species?
Someone on the crack pipe?
Definitely non-native. No ecological benefit. And I think it's fair to consider releasing such species into narrow bands of marginal (slowly improving) habitat in southern utah questionable at best. Doesn't help that I've seen 2 hawks shot down during the pheasant hunt in southern Utah, though hard to blame such wanton, and likely illegal, waste on the bird.

Further north, assessments may be different. Midwest, evidence seems to point that the abundance of quality habitat means they coexist well with native species.

I'll hunt the birds as long as DWR releases them as it's a great excuse to be active this time of the year. But the tradition down here is long past justifiable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
Midwest, evidence seems to point that the abundance of quality habitat means they coexist well with native species.
.
Given the drastic declines and reduced ranges of the Prairie chicken species, I don't think having an invasive competitive species like pheasants does them any favors
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Midwest, evidence seems to point that the abundance of quality habitat means they coexist well with native species.
.
Given the drastic declines and reduced ranges of the Prairie chicken species, I don't think having an invasive competitive species like pheasants does them any favors
We'll I guess that's what I get for not vetting a pro-hunting source 😬😆

Tasty birds but they are a bit of conservation quagmire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,932 Posts
the discussion reminds me of Capitol Reef National Park. It confuses me that the Park will high-fence the non-native flora to protect it from being eaten by native ungulates.


I saw a pheasant once up near the top of Haleakala. Poor thing looked terrible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Invasive is 100% value based as it's defined by negative impact which depends on the species you value. Introducing a non-native species into a region whose riparian areas have been in problematic condition for decades (or longer) qualifies as deleterious to me and therefore invasive. If our riparian ecosystems weren't undergoing decades long drought and the pressure of sprawl on top of it I might his different conclusion.

For perspective....they release the birds into Quichapa outside Cedar City. Our county's water project all but guarantee continued low levels there for years to come. I'm fine with that (I like water for my house) but it matters when dealing with these obligates. That habitat is increasingly in trouble. This isn't an area that has much in the way of waste grain so, in theory, (if they actually survived more than a few days) their forage would overlap with just about every other relevant species trying to survive in that areas suboptimal habitat. That scenario is only going to get worse as the Cedar City population continues to explode.

Others may differ but it's not smoking crack to call pen raised birds released in such areas invasive. They are a fun reason to get out on a November morning and taste great. But the program down here is a bit silly at best. But I'm a fan of prioritizing native species that are largely self-sustaining.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
the discussion reminds me of Capitol Reef National Park. It confuses me that the Park will high-fence the non-native flora to protect it from being eaten by native ungulates.

I saw a pheasant once up near the top of Haleakala. Poor thing looked terrible.
They do that? Not study sites?

I say unleash full pressure on such species. Hell, just bring in domestic goats for a few days and only let them graze on those sites (they were doing that in Denver for certain grasses and/or hard to reach areas).

That said I know Park units have different administrative constraints. We do live in a world with plenty of contradictions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,559 Posts
They do that? Not study sites?

I say unleash full pressure on such species. Hell, just bring in domestic goats for a few days and only let them graze on those sites (they were doing that in Denver for certain grasses and/or hard to reach areas).

That said I know Park units have different administrative constraints. We do live in a world with plenty of contradictions
Keep domestic goats and sheep as far from wild sheep habitat as possible!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,932 Posts
They do that? Not study sites?
LOL. Yes, they do that. They are called "orchards". Fruit trees. Apples, apricots, peaches, etc. The orchards are on the National Register of Historic Places.

So, yes, they put up high fences to keep the deer out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,932 Posts
Keep domestic goats and sheep as far from wild sheep habitat as possible!
Wild sheep in Capitol Reef? They should be, and frequently are in the area. But due to proximity to domestic livestock, State agencies try to keep them away....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,680 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
They do that? Not study sites?
LOL. Yes, they do that. They are called "orchards". Fruit trees. Apples, apricots, peaches, etc. The orchards are on the National Register of Historic Places.

So, yes, they put up high fences to keep the deer out.
Too funny. Totally missed that freebie.

Different mandates for sure.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top