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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So is it better to pull the blade across the stone at an angle or the small circles method? Also just curios what people pack out into the field to sharpen their knives? Thanks for any tips and info!
 

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Do you want to put an edge on the knife, or just remove metal? Circles will remove metal, but won't do as good of a job of putting an edge on the blade.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Do you want to put an edge on the knife, or just remove metal? Circles will remove metal, but won't do as good of a job of putting an edge on the blade.

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definitely an edge, just for all purpose hunting, skinning, cutting meat off etc... So if it's crazy dull, maybe the circle method and then do the strokes/pull the blade across the stone to get that edge??
 

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Angle!!!Make sure its the same on both sides.Always go the same direction.Circles screw up an edge!If its really dull take it to your butcher and have him put an edge on it for you.(Maybe ask him first,some of those old meat cutters can be onery:mrgreen:)
 
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Get yourself a spyderco tri-anlge sharpmaker. Picked one up about a year and a half ago and now my EDC knife is always razor sharp. Takes literally 5 minutes to keep it shaving sharp as long as you are good about maintaining the edge. I stopped carrying anything into the field to sharpen a knife when I picked up a Havalon a few years ago. If the blade gets dull I just swap out blades.
 

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Pull the blade towards you from handle to point.

At home I use the Lansky set-up a couple times a year and then a steel as I use the knife. In the field I carry one of those little carbide/ceramic/steel rod sharpening thingies.

My broadhead sharpener does a fair job sharpening my hunting knife in the field.

I'm carrying a Havalon more and more. The knife and a handful of blades weigh nothing are great for skinning.
 

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Franklin 2801216 Knif...These are easy to use,but do eat up a lot of steel.Very handy and small.You will want to use a fine or ceramic steel to finish the edge.
 
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Good advice so far. I use a similar tool as the one Dunkem posted to start and then finish on a steel. I'll just add that if you leave home with a sharp knife then it is easy to keep a sharp edge on it in the field. Running a knife over a steel every few minutes while working will keep the edge sharp.

Just my opinion, but I see WAY TOO many guys come into my shop with bandages from Razor knifes (such as the Havalon). The past 3 years I have had 6 or 7 guys come in who had to seek medical attention after cutting themselves with a razor knife. Most all I ask said they had never cut themselves like that before. OK, off my soapbox.

This is the sharpener I carry in the field and is one I use around the shop. Very small and works very well.

http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/.../Diamond-Sharpeners/prod99999030818/cat100813

This is the knife I carry in the field and use the most of any knife in my shop. It is very small, lightwieght (can carry 2) and flexible. It also is very cheap. I've gutted, caped, quartered, boned, numerous moose with this knife and it is slick.

http://www.webstaurantstore.com/vic...ogleShopping&gclid=CO7ii7Ssl8cCFRCEaQodkMAAXQ
 

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Packout,Victorinox aka Forschner has been my knife of choice all the years of cutting meat(with a few Chicago cutlery in the mix).
 

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I own a TON of knives and alot of sharpeners, from Buck to Lansky and many other inbetween. I agree with the advice given above. I've spent hours and hours sharpening various knives with the Lansky kit... which is a great setup as it keeps your angles. But, frankly I haven't touched it since I was given one of these for Christmas:



It works soooo slick. The belts are basically sandpaper of various grit, from coarse 80grit on up to 6000 for a nice polish. You can maintain your angles, and put an edge on like I've never seen before. Think about it, its how the factory puts the edge on their new knives. The trick is to use *LIGHT* pressure on the knife to the belt so you dont overheat the edge. Most of my knives only needed the slightest pass with the finest belt to keep them razor sharp. When belts wear out, dont buy new ones, just get some new sandpaper, cut it to the width of the belt, and just glue it on over the top of the old belt. Works slick and is cheap to maintain.

Anywho, I only have so much time anymore... I used to sit on the couch and sharpen knives while watching TV... now I seem to need that time for something else.

Oh and as a sidenote, its comically amusing out of all the cool and snazzy knives I own, I've gutted more big game animals with this stupid thing than all my other knives combined (because its always with me).



-DallanC
 

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We have something similar to that at work,your right, LIGHT pressure is the key to using a belt sharpener.Had not thought about replacing the belt with sand paper8)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
appreciate the advice! So if I use the havalon for skinning than it would probably be a good idea to use some gloves for protection than? My main knife is a kershaw hunting knife and that's what I've used for everything.
 

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We have something similar to that at work,your right, LIGHT pressure is the key to using a belt sharpener.Had not thought about replacing the belt with sand paper8)
Interesting, I just stumbled on a video showing a guy who saved his worn belts and applied jewelers rouge to them for ultra fine polishing of knife edges.

-DallanC
 

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I own a TON of knives and alot of sharpeners, from Buck to Lansky and many other inbetween. I agree with the advice given above. I've spent hours and hours sharpening various knives with the Lansky kit... which is a great setup as it keeps your angles. But, frankly I haven't touched it since I was given one of these for Christmas:



It works soooo slick. The belts are basically sandpaper of various grit, from coarse 80grit on up to 6000 for a nice polish. You can maintain your angles, and put an edge on like I've never seen before. Think about it, its how the factory puts the edge on their new knives. The trick is to use *LIGHT* pressure on the knife to the belt so you dont overheat the edge. Most of my knives only needed the slightest pass with the finest belt to keep them razor sharp. When belts wear out, dont buy new ones, just get some new sandpaper, cut it to the width of the belt, and just glue it on over the top of the old belt. Works slick and is cheap to maintain.

Anywho, I only have so much time anymore... I used to sit on the couch and sharpen knives while watching TV... now I seem to need that time for something else.

Oh and as a sidenote, its comically amusing out of all the cool and snazzy knives I own, I've gutted more big game animals with this stupid thing than all my other knives combined (because its always with me).



-DallanC
I thought about getting in touch with Work Sharp and seeing if I could get a commission on the number of these that I have recommended to others who purchased them. They are the best thing out there to sharpen a knife bar none.

Sportsmans, and Cabela's sell them and if you go directly to the Work Sharp web site you can usually pick up better deals along with a canvas case and extra belts.

For touching up a blade in the field I just have a diamond stone.
 

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appreciate the advice! So if I use the havalon for skinning than it would probably be a good idea to use some gloves for protection than? My main knife is a kershaw hunting knife and that's what I've used for everything.
Kevlar gloves are what we use at work.They protect you from cuts,but not punctures.Personally I think they are a pain in the ### I still have all my fingers(well maybe some of them have been whittled down:))But for use in wild game I would recommend them.Take some surgical gloves to put over them and they stay a lot cleaner.Youi can pick up the kevlar gloves at most restaurant supply cos.
 

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Or you can pass on using a razor blade to skin, debone and cut yourself. haha
Order one of those $4 Victorinox knives and you'll be surprised what it will do. Although they are not very nostalgic.....
 

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I've got an old arkansas stone that I've been using for years. Great for knives, chisels, and broadheads if you're careful. Just a little water or rem-oil on the stone, and go 9 on each side, 8 on each side, 7 on each side.... and it is ready to cut through just about anything. I have ceramic rods I use for kitchen/fillet knives.
 

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appreciate the advice! So if I use the havalon for skinning than it would probably be a good idea to use some gloves for protection than? My main knife is a kershaw hunting knife and that's what I've used for everything.
Yeah, the Havalon is dangerously sharp, not for everyone. They have their place. I use the things more around the house than in the field.

.
 

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I own a TON of knives and alot of sharpeners, from Buck to Lansky and many other inbetween. I agree with the advice given above. I've spent hours and hours sharpening various knives with the Lansky kit... which is a great setup as it keeps your angles. But, frankly I haven't touched it since I was given one of these for Christmas:



It works soooo slick. The belts are basically sandpaper of various grit, from coarse 80grit on up to 6000 for a nice polish. You can maintain your angles, and put an edge on like I've never seen before. Think about it, its how the factory puts the edge on their new knives. The trick is to use *LIGHT* pressure on the knife to the belt so you dont overheat the edge. Most of my knives only needed the slightest pass with the finest belt to keep them razor sharp. When belts wear out, dont buy new ones, just get some new sandpaper, cut it to the width of the belt, and just glue it on over the top of the old belt. Works slick and is cheap to maintain.

Anywho, I only have so much time anymore... I used to sit on the couch and sharpen knives while watching TV... now I seem to need that time for something else.

Oh and as a sidenote, its comically amusing out of all the cool and snazzy knives I own, I've gutted more big game animals with this stupid thing than all my other knives combined (because its always with me).



-DallanC
My son-in-law has one. It is pretty slick. I think I'll get one. I think most knives out of the factory are sharpened on a belt sander.

.
 
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