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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you guys do it? Do you do it for fun, to get up in the woods to hunt, or for other reasons? I'm contemplating a pair or even a pair of cross country ski's to get into some areas I'd otherwise be locked out of when the snow flies... but wanted to hear input from other forum members on how they get into the backcountry when road closures happen because of snow coverage. I don't have access to or really want access to a snowmobile.... I'd be after the physical aspect along with the peace and quiet I found skiing along cross country trails and back roads in California when I lived there. I'd guess that the Mirror Lake Hwy and some of the Diamond Fork/Hobble Creek areas would present me with the same circumstances later in the year.
 

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I dabbled in snowshoeing back when I did back country snowboarding. It is a workout-- especially with a board, pack, and a bunch of beer. They don't work well just after a fresh dump-- the snow here is so dry and fluffy, but a few days after a storm and the wind and cold nights have condensed and hardened the snow a bit, they are a decent war to get around. Touring skis are probably a better way around here though.
 

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I enjoy snow shoeing. But cross country skiing sure lets you travel further and faster. CCing does take you a couple of year to get semi profiecent at it compared to snow shoeing.
This will be my 4th year CCing . You need a good back pack------------- for the cloths you will be taking off until you learn how to dress. 5 below and you start out almost frozen.
10 minutes later you are down to a shirt.
If you are really looking at using them for fishing or hunting you will probably want to start out CCing and pack snow shoes. Once you get down nearer the river or into the willows skis will be tough to handle in all the brush.
 

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I would like to try snowshoeing if I coulf find some snowshoe hares to hunt. I think it would be pretty fun.
 

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When I was involved in Special Olympics we would rent snow shoes for our athletes. I would sneak a pair to go play with. It was a lot of fun, really good workout. I would love to get me a pair soon for ice fishing and just being able to be active in the winter time.
 

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I would suggest renting some snowshoes to try out. Before buying my own pair, I used to rent them from REI. There are a number of styles, all designed for different activities and levels of buoyancy, so it's important to pick the ones that feel best and work for how you intend to use them.

Just a few things to consider... Snowshoes don't really let you walk on top of the snow like some people think. Instead, they just limit how far you sink down into it. For me, hiking a mile in snowshoes is probably the equivalent, in terms of effort, to walking four miles on dry ground. Still, they provide a means to get outdoors in the winter. And for those of us living along the Wasatch Front, a good excuse to get out of the dreary inversions and see some actual sunshine is a good thing. It also makes for a good aerobic workout.

As others have said, cross country skis are an option that you shouldn't dismiss. They take longer to get the hang of, but they will generally let you travel further and a bit faster (plus you get to slide downhill). Even so, I prefer snowshoes, but that's just me — others, like my wife, will say the exact opposite.
 

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I prefer snowshoes just because I use them as a tool to workout in the winter while still getting up into more remote area, I enjoy getting up higher than the skies allow.
 

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I dont think there is anything that replaces the fun of a snowmobile, but Snowshoing can be ok. I have a pair that I like to use when Im just out playing around. They work pretty good for trying to get into a area quietly while calling coyotes. Snowmobile is still my choice for winter travel. You can get to places you never thought about with anything else. You could get a snowmobile for the fun times, & try out this when you feel the need to exercise :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'd guess that anywhere on the Front would be free pretty much, along with the most of the Uintas. There is the 3.00 use fee for some parts, but if you go up on some of the roads, you get outside the fee area. I'd guess up north by Monte Cristo and that you could probably hike around as well up the Hobble Creek/Diamond Fork canyons.
 
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