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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any predictions? What's gonna be left of Mead and Powell? How does that bode for our wildlife populations? Fisheries? Forest fires? Agriculture? We still gonna have lawns? Am I the only one going, " OH, SH$!!$!#TTT!!!" yet?

Honestly, this situation is starting to get worrying. People like my dad seem to think that all the brilliant minds of the world will always be able to invent and innovate us out of any pickle we ever find ourselves in. I wish I could be so optimistic.
 

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I'm surprised that someone hasn't started a pipeline from up in Canada down to the west here. They could pipe water into some reservoirs and lakes that already exist and then run pipes out of them down to the arid west. I don't believe that it would take too much to get a pipeline into the Green River drainage to feed Flaming Gorge which in turn could be used to feed Lake Powell.
 

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I believe California uses somewhere around 60% of the water from the Colorado River. California also has 840 miles of shoreline. We start by advancing desalinization processes so California can become H2O self-reliant by taking advantage of the "rising ocean levels".
As Critter said, I think a piping distribution system could also be potentially effective. A North America piping infrastructure could distribute water to areas around the continent as needed (I know that's easier said done when it comes to counties, states, provinces and countries agreeing to share "their" water.
I look at the $$$ the government squanders on stupid S&%T, these are just a couple if ideas they should seriously be looking to invest in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm surprised that someone hasn't started a pipeline from up in Canada down to the west here. They could pipe water into some reservoirs and lakes that already exist and then run pipes out of them down to the arid west. I don't believe that it would take too much to get a pipeline into the Green River drainage to feed Flaming Gorge which in turn could be used to feed Lake Powell.
Maybe it has been proposed, but then the Canadians remembered the tale of Owens Valley in southern California and wisey told the Americans to shove the proposal up their bums.
 

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When it comes down to it those areas that need the water are going to eat a lot of crow and get on their knees to work deals with those areas that have excess water. It isn't just California but Utah, Nevada, Arizona, and to some extent Colorado.

There are areas in each of those states have taken just about all the water from other areas to the point that there isn't any water left.

But like most problems they don't consider it a problem until it is too late.

As a example a number of years ago a Colorado state leglesater wanted to build a dam on the Utah state line and then pump the water from that reservoir over the continental divide to Denver, bypassing the rest of the state. The bad thing was that they actually looked at doing this.

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This is the way I see it.

One needs to remember that Utah is the second most arid state in the nation, followed by Arizona being at the top. Utah receives the snowfall and rain that fills the reservoirs for distribution to municipalities, water share holders and so on.
We've had some higher than normal summer temps along with a record setting stretch of no precipitation for three months. With the hot, dry temps, water evaporates quicker. The problem I see, is the record number of people coming to Utah, record demand for housing for these folks and yards with lawns that are requiring on average 500 gallons of water to keep them green.

The waterbodies are filling, but not at the 100% level. Then, they are being drained faster to meat the demand for homes, agriculture, and so on. If we are to "slow the flow", slow the infiltration of people moving into the state. I also think that the home builders should pay up-front impact fees to the state for the average amount of each household they build and sell (average home of 4 is 400 gallons a day) Ya, home costs are out of this world, but they are still building, and selling them at record pace. Same with the water situation....We are using it faster than it's produced. Something has to give or we will be "up a DRY creek without a paddle" or, any need for one.
 

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I'm surprised that someone hasn't started a pipeline from up in Canada down to the west here. They could pipe water into some reservoirs and lakes that already exist and then run pipes out of them down to the arid west. I don't believe that it would take too much to get a pipeline into the Green River drainage to feed Flaming Gorge which in turn could be used to feed Lake Powell.
In the early 90s the governor of Alaska proposed building a pipeline to California to provide freshwater, but at the time water conservation measures were less expensive and able to free up as much water as a pipeline would have brought, without the added environmental concerns
 

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I'm surprised that someone hasn't started a pipeline from up in Canada down to the west here. They tried that already.....Biden shut it down. :rolleyes:
Water, not oil....At least they can say that if there was a pipe break all you will end up with is mud and localized flooding.

But I am sure that the greenies would find a fault with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
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I believe California uses somewhere around 60% of the water from the Colorado River. California also has 840 miles of shoreline. We start by advancing desalinization processes so California can become H2O self-reliant by taking advantage of the "rising ocean levels".
As Critter said, I think a piping distribution system could also be potentially effective. A North America piping infrastructure could distribute water to areas around the continent as needed (I know that's easier said done when it comes to counties, states, provinces and countries agreeing to share "their" water.
I look at the $$$ the government squanders on stupid S&%T, these are just a couple if ideas they should seriously be looking to invest in.
I don't claim to be an expert on the matter, but from what little I have read about desalinization it sounds like a very energy intensive process. California is already strapped for electricity as it is. Every time you think you have found a solution, there is a new hurdle. I guess we can always turn thousands more acres of Utah into solar farms.
 

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Any predictions? What's gonna be left of Mead and Powell? How does that bode for our wildlife populations? Fisheries? Forest fires? Agriculture? We still gonna have lawns?

I think we are already seeing an effect with the wildlife. It is usually forgotten in our desperate "save the herd" threads, but from about 2012-2017, we had pretty good deer herd growth and conditions were decent. SFW was patting itself on the back as the herd numbers neared 400,000. Since then, we certainly haven't had horrible winters, but we have definitely had the drought. While I don't claim it is the only cause, I do believe that range degradation from drought conditions is a big part in the poor fawn and calf recruitment we have been seeing. As for fisheries, the cause and effect is obvious. I fear more of the same in the coming years.

As for where it ends, eventually, there simply won't be enough water for the continued growth and hard decisions will have to be made. Conservation certainly can help to a point, and maybe technology can help some with desalinization or long distance piping. However, even these "cures" have their limits. Piping water from one dry western state to another is just a shell game as we all are in the same boat. Carrying capacity is a biological principle that applies to us too. I just wish the growth,growth,growth politicians could get even a glimpse of that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think we are already seeing an effect with the wildlife. It is usually forgotten in our desperate "save the herd" threads, but from about 2012-2017, we had pretty good deer herd growth and conditions were decent. SFW was patting itself on the back as the herd numbers neared 400,000. Since then, we certainly haven't had horrible winters, but we have definitely had the drought. While I don't claim it is the only cause, I do believe that range degradation from drought conditions is a big part in the poor fawn and calf recruitment we have been seeing. As for fisheries, the cause and effect is obvious. I fear more of the same in the coming years.

As for where it ends, eventually, there simply won't be enough water for the continued growth and hard decisions will have to be made. Conservation certainly can help to a point, and maybe technology can help some with desalinization or long distance piping. However, even these "cures" have their limits. Piping water from one dry western state to another is just a shell game as we all are in the same boat. Carrying capacity is a biological principle that applies to us too. I just wish the growth,growth,growth politicians could get even a glimpse of that.
Last year during the archery hunt I kept seeing a "bachelorette herd" of about 7 does with no fawns. That was so weird and unsettling.
 
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