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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
European Sparrows were introduced to North America in New York City in 1852 to control the Linden Moth. Since then the little birds have done well, spreading across the continent. They've done especially well on my bird feeders so well some sparrow "management" was warranted.

Europeans have eaten sparrows, and starlings, since ancient Roman times, maybe longer. In the book Unmentionable CUISINE author Calvin W. Schwabe has no less than 15 recipes for sparrow and other small birds. Schwabe describes small bird casseroles, broiling, grilling, soups and stews, sparrow pies, and crunchy deep-fat fried sparrows that are just popped in the mouth eaten whole, bones and all! Schwabe says "In the Middle East and elsewhere, the smallest broiled birds usually are not drawn and are eaten bones and all. Uh...I'm just gonna skin mine for now, thank you.

I've put a few things together with stuff laying around in the fridge and pantry. I'm calling it "Sparrow Surprise".


Sparrow Surprise


Ingredients:
5 - house sparrows, skinned whole
12 oz - ground pork sausage
5 - sweet mini peppers, tops removed and cored
2 - sweet mini peppers, diced
1/2 tsp - fresh thyme, minced
1/2 tsp - fresh Rosemary, minced

Instructions:
· Soak the birds overnight in lightly salted milk.
· Preheat oven to 350°
· Blend the diced peppers, thyme and Rosemary with the sausage.
· Pack 1 tbsp of sausage into the bottom of each mini pepper.
· Tightly stuff 1 tbsp of sausage into the body cavity of each bird.
· Push a stuffed bird into each pepper "head first".
· Fill any voids between the bird and the pepper shell with sausage.
· Form a ball with the remaining sausage and place in a small casserole dish or bowl.
· Position the stuffed peppers on the ball of sausage.
· Bake in oven for 30 minutes or until the peppers are done.

Comments:
· Can substitute sweet peppers with jalapenos or pablano peppers.
· Leave the heart, lungs and liver in the body cavity if you like.

Not too complicated:


Soak the sparrows overnight in some lightly salted milk:


Mix this with the pork sausage:


Don't overcook:


The meat is mild-flavored, not "birdy" like dove or starling:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Goob, I have one question for you:

Did your wife know what she was getting into when she married you?
Yeah I think so. :)

We come from a culturally different part of the country so what people out here find odd we take for granted.

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I don't see it as odd but I can just imagine my ex-wife if I would of told her that we were going to have sparrow surprise.

I know one thing, I would love to be your neighbor just to try everything that you cook up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know... That looks pretty freaking funny to me! I may give that a go. There's also a few fields that I can get plenty of starlings out of. Hmm...
Cool. IMHO sparrow eats better than starling. Starling is tough and strong-flavored, kinda like crow.

Maybe I'll do a starling dish.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I don't see it as odd but I can just imagine my ex-wife if I would of told her that we were going to have sparrow surprise.

I know one thing, I would love to be your neighbor just to try everything that you cook up.
Oh, OK.

Hey, if you're ever in Evanston be sure to bring a cooler with you. :smile:

I think the first month Mrs Goob and I were together she cooked up some calf nuts. Neither one of us thought anything of it though.

She use to do pigeon but won't do sparrow though.

I had quail one time at a fancy restaurant. They cooked the birds whole, naturally, but left the feet on the birds! It was so cool. I've eaten a lot of quail but those were the best! Uh...had to pay extra for the feet though.

Hey, speaking of pigeon, I make the best pigeon pot pie this side of the Big River.

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
I ate a robin once. Once.

but a sparrow...I might just give that a go now.
Robin is good. For some reason birds that eat nightcrawlers, like robin, snipe and wood****, are good.

Uh...that's what I've heard. Robins are protected songbirds.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
the legs and feet are handles

Now that is a fowl variation of stuffed peppers!:mrgreen: Actually sounds pretty good.
These tasted as good as any dove I ever ate. They oughtta be good as much bird seed as they ate every day.

Having the birds "surrounded" by sausage kept them moist though. I was careful not to over cook them but still could have shortened the cooking time some.

There's just not much to them.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I wouldn't doubt that for one second! Probably the best in North America and you're just being humble. I love how open minded you are, wish I had your abilities in the kitchen and your willingness to try new things.
Thank you, kind words.

Back in the day in the Midwest there were small grain farms everywhere. Each one had a big barn or two full of pigeons. There was cracked corn, oats, wheat and millet all over. The birds were fat with grain, tasty, as good as any dove, better than any duck. We shot a lot of them. It was cheaper, and a lot less work, than messing with clay pigeons. :smile: What we didn't eat went to the hogs.

Growing up back then was like a scene from a Norman Rockwell painting. Those were the days and I miss them so.

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