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Took the old truck out in the snow between Dell and Knolls just to see how the old girl does 4 wheeling. Ran into two groups of lopers, one group of around 30 and the other around 20. Most I've seen at one time out there. Was pretty cool!
 

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What the heck to "shed" pronghorn look like anyway? I've never seen a picture of a shed one... I've found sheaths hiking / hunting a few times. I've rotted horns off for mounts as well... always wondered how far they shed down to, just what is exposed post shedding?


-DallanC
 

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The Wyoming bucks have been shed for a month or so. The look like big antelope with little horns that dont have prongs.
I'm jealous, you fellas up in Kemmererrerrer have antelope right in town. In the winter I gotta drive 2 miles to watch 'em here in Hooterville.

Pronghorns kick their horns off with their hind legs, their hooves. Some say antelope will eat the bottom half of the sheds; not only the shed's owner but any goat in the herd will chow down. I seen them do it on a National Geographic special about pronghorns, although I have not witnessed it first hand...I have found a few sheaths that appeared to have been chewed on by something with bigger teeth than some rodent though.

The antelope over here look really good. They're going into the winter fat and sassy with a lot of food. The snow is deep but not crusty, icy, so the wind is, or will, blowing a lot of the snow off the sagebrush, off the steppe, where they are wintering. So far, so good....5 more months of winter.
 
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I'm jealous, you fellas up in Kemmererrerrer have antelope right in town. In the winter I gotta drive 2 miles to watch 'em here in Hooterville.

Pronghorns kick their horns off with their hind legs, their hooves. Some say antelope will eat the bottom half of the sheds; not only the shed's owner but any goat in the herd will chow down. I seen them do it on a National Geographic special about pronghorns, although I have not witnessed it first hand...I have found a few sheaths that appeared to have been chewed on by something with bigger teeth than some rodent though.

The antelope over here look really good. They're going into the winter fat and sassy with a lot of food. The snow is deep but not crusty, icy, so the wind is, or will, blowing a lot of the snow off the sagebrush, off the steppe, where they are wintering. So far, so good....5 more months of winter.
I spend a lot of time in Big Piney and LaBarge, lots of lopes up there. Some of the herds have 50+ in them, its pretty amazing.
 
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