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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am concerned that splitting the LE elk hunts into an early and a late hunt might unfairly effect the draw process. Here is my thinking. In November access to public land is very limited and elk are moving to winter ranges. Permits issued for these hunts favor those who can hunt on private property ( the lower elavation areas more typicle of winter range). I suspect that more hunters apply for fewer permits (fewer due to splitting the permit nunbers in half) for the earlier hunt. More applicatiions for fewer permits = less chances for the average Joe Blow hunter to draw a permit and hunt on public land. Thoughts?
 

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I guess it would depend on the unit...on the units I am most familiar with, this would not be an issue because the winter range is mostly public land.
 

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you say this like it hasn't been going on? :?: so are you worried :?: or are you going to put in for the less amount unfavorable one's :?:
I'm will not be loosing any sleep tonight over this, :? try to do the same :wink:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wyoming2utah said:
I guess it would depend on the unit...on the units I am most familiar with, this would not be an issue because the winter range is mostly public land.
I am thinking of the units that I suspect are some of the most popular like the Manti-Lasal and the Wasatch Mountain units.
 

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There has been a late season hunt running on all the limited entry elk area for 2-3 years now. I have heard of some good bulls taken from some of these units. Last year I was with a friend on the San Juan unit during the September hunt and talked to a guy who had the late season tag the year before. He said he saw some great bulls and killed a nice one. The funny thing is he was hunting at the same high elevation we were hunting in September on Public land.

Mark
 

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A couple of other things to think about with these two hunts: 1) a lot more tags are given to the early hunt than the late hunt 2) the late hunt takes place after the rut when many bulls have broken tines; for some hunters this takes away from its appeal 3) private landowners have an advantage in many hunts...general season hunts especially; what can we do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
wyoming2utah said:
A couple of other things to think about with these two hunts: 1) a lot more tags are given to the early hunt than the late hunt 2) the late hunt takes place after the rut when many bulls have broken tines; for some hunters this takes away from its appeal 3) private landowners have an advantage in many hunts...general season hunts especially; what can we do?
Amen. Good points, all. My question is still the same. Are the odds of drawing a late season permit much better than drawing an early season permit because there are a lot more hunters applying for the early season permits even though there are more permits? And would there be better odds for everyone if all the permits were lumped together in the early season as they were a few years ago. I guess I really don't see the advantage of splitting the permits. That said I will answer my own question partly this way....Last September my wife and I went for an ATV ride/grouse hunt up on Willow Creek Ridge and I was really surprised at the number of big game (presumablly LE elk) hunters we saw. It might be an advantage to split the number of hunters with the number of permits. That is the only advantage I can see.
 
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