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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently gained custody of a shotgun that has been in the family for at least a century, a John Buckingham 12-gauge. It's nothing special in itself; from what I can tell, Buckinghams were an inexpensive department store brand pretty common among farmers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. But it belonged to either my great-great grandfather Gulbrand Jørgensen, his father Jørgen Gulbrandsen, or perhaps even Jørgen's father Gulbrand Jørgensen (yes, that does in fact keep going back to at least the 1600s). So I feel something of an obligation to do some restoration.

I don't want to get it into shooting condition, but there is a thick wad of tape around the grip of the stock through the trigger guard, and the stock seems to wiggle at that point. I suspect that the stock is broken there. Anyone know of someone in the Salt Lake-ish area who would be good for that kind of work? Thanks for any recommendations you can provide.
 

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"I don't want to get it into shooting condition, " well then, hang it on the wall to look at and enjoy! and write down your story about it.
 

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This gun is a family keepsake....PERIOD. Do not under any circumstance change it, restore it, modify it, clean it up, refinish it, etc, etc, etc! Every single thing about this firearm is your heritage and is worth keeping. That tape for example, it was put on there by the hands of one of your grandfathers, that big scratch, same thing...leave it exactly as you got it and pass it on to the most deserving son or daughter(or other nearest relative ) with the same instructions I just gave you.
You're a lucky man that someone did this for your.
 

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A lot of history. I think that is more valuable than the gun itself. Let's see a pic.

I have something similar. My dad's old Parker Bros 12 gauge side by side hammerless. My dad broke the stock and he made a new one, he carved it himself with his pocket knife, file and sandpaper.

It was still shooting when I retired it, I shot my first pheasant with it at age 12, that was over 50 years ago, yes I am dating myself, so it has a lot of great memories.
 

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Lets say if that tape is bugging you that bad. You could remove it for a good look.

They do repair stocks on stocks by drilling and gluing a pin in place through the crack. That vintage maybe a brass pin may look like a repair that was made back in the day? Or remove the tape and cover the crack with good old vintage leather laced together?

Post some pics. I bet that crack just adds some great character to heirloom.
 

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Yep, for a non shooter I would just remove the tape and hang it up somewhere, the shotgun not the tape.

But what JerryH suggested may look it look a lot better, or the crack may be able to just be glued.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yep, for a non shooter I would just remove the tape and hang it up somewhere, the shotgun not the tape.
But I have a great place above my fireplace for that tape, Critter!

Seriously, thanks for the encouragement to leave it alone. It does look pretty good as-is; certainly someone took care with the tape job on it rather than just keeping the pieces together so they didn't get lost. It will look great above a fireplace along with my Lee-Enfield No. 4.

By popular demand...


Wood Shotgun Fishing reel Trigger Gun accessory
Bicycle handlebar Bicycle part Wood Air gun Trigger
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Pretty cool(y)
 

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You are so lucky to have that. The gun is cool but coming down a family line and knowing it's story makes it priceless.
 
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