Utah Wildlife Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There seem to be lots of people with international hunting experience -- Africa, Canada ... -- on this forum. I'd like to get a sense of how complicated it is to transport hunting rifles on an airplane.

I found this on the US: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition. That seems straightforward, so the question might be more about the destination.

I might take a hunting rifle to Europe. Does anybody have experience with that?

Thanks for any pointers on the pitfalls of travel with guns ...
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,654 Posts
As you said the link is fairly straight forward. But you will need a US Customs form 4457 that declares that you own the rifle/scope that you are taking out of the country. You may also need this form for the country that you are going to to prove ownership of the firearm. You also want anything that you are taking with you logged on the 4457 such as camera, binoculars, computer, or anything else that has a serial number on it.

For the country that you are going to you need to do some research on it on what they require. Some of the countries are fairly lenient while others are pain in the rear. Also if you may have problems getting a rifle into a country if you don't have a hunt arranged where you will use the rifle. Also some will only let you bring in ammo that will fit that rifle and nothing else.

Another thing that you want to look into is the requirements of the airline that you plan to fly with. There are more than you think that are not firearm friendly and to fly with them is a hassle as far a your rifle is concerned.

So if you plan on taking a pleasure or working trip to a country in Europe I would suggest to leave the rifle at home and then if you find a hunt you can do either rent or borrow a rifle from the outfitter that you quite possibly will be required to hire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Critter has it pretty much right. The main thing in Europe is to have all the right paperwork- the internet makes that fairly easy. But have several copies of everything... do not cut corners on this. I'd be wary of bringing a semi-auto, that might give you trouble, especially in Germany. If you have a magazine, you might want to carry it (empty) separately... more than three-round capacity might confuse the paperwork in Germany. (There's target rifle rules and hunting rifle rules in Germany- you want hunting, but it is possible to get the wrong paperwork.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As you said the link is fairly straight forward. But you will need a US Customs form 4457 that declares that you own the rifle/scope that you are taking out of the country. You may also need this form for the country that you are going to to prove ownership of the firearm. You also want anything that you are taking with you logged on the 4457 such as camera, binoculars, computer, or anything else that has a serial number on it.

For the country that you are going to you need to do some research on it on what they require. Some of the countries are fairly lenient while others are pain in the rear. Also if you may have problems getting a rifle into a country if you don't have a hunt arranged where you will use the rifle. Also some will only let you bring in ammo that will fit that rifle and nothing else.

Another thing that you want to look into is the requirements of the airline that you plan to fly with. There are more than you think that are not firearm friendly and to fly with them is a hassle as far a your rifle is concerned.

So if you plan on taking a pleasure or working trip to a country in Europe I would suggest to leave the rifle at home and then if you find a hunt you can do either rent or borrow a rifle from the outfitter that you quite possibly will be required to hire.
Thanks! I'll look into the customs forms.

Your point on renting a rifle is well taken ... however, I'll be staying for a while and go on a bunch of hunts (likely, hopefully, no plans set in stone yet!), and I've taken bucks and boars with a borrowed rifle. Thought it'd be nice to do it with my own rig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Critter has it pretty much right. The main thing in Europe is to have all the right paperwork- the internet makes that fairly easy. But have several copies of everything... do not cut corners on this. I'd be wary of bringing a semi-auto, that might give you trouble, especially in Germany. If you have a magazine, you might want to carry it (empty) separately... more than three-round capacity might confuse the paperwork in Germany. (There's target rifle rules and hunting rifle rules in Germany- you want hunting, but it is possible to get the wrong paperwork.)
I certainly won't take a semi-auto :shock::D:D ...
I've read about the requirement to lock up rifle and ammo in separate boxes, that's a key difference to the US. One thing is that we'll possibly be crossing lots of borders within Europe, which further complicates things.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,654 Posts
With multiple countries in the mix I would forget about using my own rifle. You are going to run into problems crossing borders with each country having different requirements. That along with the possibility that the hotels that you plan on staying in my have a no firearm policy. I ran into this in South Africa and was glad that we had stored my rifle at a PH's home in his gun safe while we traveled around the country and into another country doing a tour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
With multiple countries in the mix I would forget about using my own rifle. You are going to run into problems crossing borders with each country having different requirements. That along with the possibility that the hotels that you plan on staying in my have a no firearm policy. I ran into this in South Africa and was glad that we had stored my rifle at a PH's home in his gun safe while we traveled around the country and into another country doing a tour.
Yeahhhhhhh ... I see that problem. Food for thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Born and raised in Europe and I would also advise hiring one as part of your hunting trip rather than the hassle of taking your own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Appreciate the warnings ... I'll let you all know how it goes, as I'll get in touch with people over there.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top