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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was re-arranging an area in the shop yesterday trying to figure out an area to place a new piece of equipment that will be arriving in a couple weeks. (I have to much crap that's for sure) In doing so, I came across two boxes that were stuffed under a bench all the way against the wall in the back. I found the 2 dozen #3 Bridger 4 coils I bought four years ago. Amazing what you can find in your own shop/garage when you start moving things around.

I was curious to see if anyone has, or will be heading out to lay some steel in the dirt? As for myself, If I do, it will be in a couple weeks for some canine critters. I haven't even looked at the fur prices at all for this year. I hadn't any intension of getting out with the cost at the pump. Tuff enough to even break even trapping now days.
 

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I was re-arranging an area in the shop yesterday trying to figure out an area to place a new piece of equipment that will be arriving in a couple weeks. (I have to much crap that's for sure) In doing so, I came across two boxes that were stuffed under a bench all the way against the wall in the back. I found the 2 dozen #3 Bridger 4 coils I bought four years ago. Amazing what you can find in your own shop/garage when you start moving things around.

I was curious to see if anyone has, or will be heading out to lay some steel in the dirt? As for myself, If I do, it will be in a couple weeks for some canine critters. I haven't even looked at the fur prices at all for this year. I hadn't any intension of getting out with the cost at the pump. Tuff enough to even break even trapping now days.
I trapped 37 years ago as a way to sell fur for grocery money. I mostly caught muskrat as the price for a rat then was about $5.00. I would catch 5 to 10 each night. I also caught a few beaver. I tried to use Conibear traps, as I didn't enjoy dispatching the animals caught in leghold traps. I would imagine fur prices are way down with all the anti-fur and animal rights activists out there. You are also right about the gas. To run a long trap line, you'd have to get a lot of fur to make it worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I trapped 37 years ago as a way to sell fur for grocery money. I mostly caught muskrat as the price for a rat then was about $5.00. I would catch 5 to 10 each night. I also caught a few beaver. I tried to use Conibear traps, as I didn't enjoy dispatching the animals caught in leghold traps. I would imagine fur prices are way down with all the anti-fur and animal rights activists out there. You are also right about the gas. To run a long trap line, you'd have to get a lot of fur to make it worth it.
I started in 1974 trapping rats, racoons, mink and red fox, made a lot of money as young kid. I would trade the fur for more traps and stretchers the first couple years, and before I knew it I was swimming in traps. My Dad would take me with him on his long line when I was 14. I began to go after coyote, badger, grey and reds and cats once I got my driver license. That paid some good money along with the water critters tossed in.

I looked at the wild fur market and they are predicting XL-2XL HVY will bring average of $5. Coyote western HVY will fetch up to $90-$100 high end and average at $60. If I can set 40 traps in a day and let soak and catch 10-15 Yotes, that would pay for the fuel.
 

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I run a small line (about a dozen traps) after upland season ends in February. I love trapping about as much as anything outdoorsy. There is nothing more satisfying than tricking a smart animal into stepping on a 2 inch circle.
Ecoregion Mountain Sky Meerkat Fawn
 

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I just trap skunks. year round. I quit counting. They are gross.

If I didn't have dogs (pet dogs) around, I'd put out some sets for the coyotes and foxes. But I don't want to be catching my dogs or the neighbors*. I'll just keep the cameras out and "catch" them on camera.

Atmosphere Carnivore Felidae Grey Cat


Astronomical object Midnight Tree Monochrome photography Monochrome


Carnivore Grey Dog breed Fawn Terrestrial animal




My FIL will get the traps out down south and see if we can get a bobcat or two. He typically gets laid off for a few months in the winter, and then runs some trap lines for himself (and his employer). I think he'd prefer to just trap and never have to work again!


*or their dogs either!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Bobcat prices are lower than what its worth to go after them. $150 is the top price this year and after the $15 permit, fuel, and time, a trapper would only be making about $50 a cat. Muskrats are the ones to be after this year.
 

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Bobcat prices are lower than what its worth to go after them. $150 is the top price this year and after the $15 permit, fuel, and time, a trapper would only be making about $50 a cat. Muskrats are the ones to be after this year.
What about racoon. Seems to be plenty of them around now days. I once heard a fur buyer tell a young trapper that racoon in Utah is typically no good---not sure why. I heard of one guy, years ago, that was making good money on feral cats. I believe the cat fur was going to Russia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What about racoon. Seems to be plenty of them around now days. I once heard a fur buyer tell a young trapper that racoon in Utah is typically no good---not sure why. I heard of one guy, years ago, that was making good money on feral cats. I believe the cat fur was going to Russia.
Russia and China are the largest buyers of wild fur. If their economy is up, the fur market pricing will reflect that. Also, there are thousands of green pelts being warehoused that have been sitting and waiting for the price to increase. Simple economies, overstocked commodities the price for said item drops. You can look at the last fur sale that was in October and see how many pelts were offered and how many of those were purchased. Some of the fur, like sable and racoon didn't even sell and if they did it was a prime top grade pelt going for a below average price.

There are two categories of mink offered in the sales. Ranch mink and wild mink. The bottom fell out of the ranch mink because it was believed they could have, and spread the Corona Virus. Wild mink normally sell lower than ranch mink. Reasoning behind that, is wild mink can have scares and blemishes in the pelt from fighting. Ranch mink are in a controlled environment that eliminate the defects in the fur. Mink ranchers can also breed for the highest desired color that sells the best.

A Racoon pelt will only fetch $3 - $5. That isn't worth the hassle of skinning the greasy things, washing the pelt and putting it up IMO. If a guy can learn to tan fur, they can make a great profit as a novelty item. Also, a trapper could skin an animal out for a taxidermy quality specimen. That means skinning the feet, toes, claws and turning the lips, eyes, nose and ears. If you can find a buyer for these areas, like I said, it can be profitable.
 

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I'd like to see a few more beaver trappers take beaver out of the East Fork of the Little Bear and Logan River. Also beaver in Saint Charles Creek near Bear Lake (Idaho) have made a mess of that little creek. My understanding is that the resident trapper in the area passed away and now the beaver are out of control. They've really done some damage and are building channels, dams, undercutting the banks and downing a lot of the trees.

PBH, it looks like you could have a lot of fun calling in a few coyote and fox.
 
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