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That’s a cool find. I question the authenticity of it, being as that would be 190-200 years old. But it’s still cool to see the interesting things you find out in the woods.
 

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Seeing as aspens don't really live very long it may of been some kids playing around a number of years ago.

I think that most aspens only live around 70 years and a real old one is only going to be about double that.

I've come across a number of things carved into trees that are quite suspect. I found one about Jim Bridger and the cut was still just drying out.
 

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When I was a smart alecky kid, I carved "Brigham Young" into an aspen in a remote area while deer hunting.

The same area held legitimate carvings from 1909-1910, which we thought were cool 70 years later. I have some suspicion that the Jedediah Smith one is doubtful to be authentic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Both thoughts have crossed my mind. I was researching the dates. Historically speaking I think 1829 is plausible, but I didn't start looking up the lifespan of aspens, though I have wondered. It seems like they only grow so tall, and then they start growing outwards. I have seen some pretty old (IE thick) aspens, but i've no idea of their age, nor how long they live.

Only thing that makes me think it might even be remotely authentic is the surrounding trees have all died. That tree is obviously old, and will probably die soon. I have to admit, it really is hard to believe an aspen would live that long. I am most likely being gullible. If something is too good to be true, it probably is, but it's not a chance i'll take in the remote and unlikely chance it is authetnic.

Reading tree carvings is always interesting. One thing i've noticed though is some recent ones look really old, while some old ones don't look as old. It seems to vary on tree and location. I've seen some early 1900s that were readable and not barked up so much, while some made in the 70s or 80s are barked up and illegible. So i'm not sure what to make of it. After I found that one tree, I think i spent days during that hunt, reading tree carvings trying to discern age by how much they barked up or level of illegibility. I couldn't find any reliable way to tell. It just varies too much.

edit:
Anywho, decided to go ahead and remove that video.
What's the oldest tree carving you've seen? The one I originally posted doesn't count.
 

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There is on on the hill behind my cabin that is 1907.
I go check every spring and fall to see if it's still there. I remember older ones as a kid, but those trees are all long gone.
That's the oldest existing one I have seen.
 

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One thing I have learned from tree carvings is that sheep herders are lonely for female companionship. Long boring days following the herd gives ample opportunity to draw "pictures" on aspens.
That's too funny, and so true. I remember being 14 on my first elk hunt with my dad. We were on horseback and kept coming across carvings of, shall we say, "voluptuous" women on quakies seemingly everywhere we looked. There must've been dozens, and many were freshly cut. I also have a vivid memory from that same trip of trying to use my meager 8th grade Spanish skills to ask a sheepherder (in the vicinity of all those carvings...) if he had been seeing any elk.

What a great memory.
 

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The funniest tree I ever saw is on north skyline past the fish creek parking lot down an old ditch/terrace cut out on the east side . It lists the date and that so and so made passionate love to one another at this very tree. Down further on a tree a few years later it looked like the female carved that she still loved the male. It's been a few years since I have been there but I thought it was pretty dang funny
 

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I've seen lots of carvings in the Uintas up high written in Spanish which indicates most of them where done on horse back by sheep herders most of them with the word "Oro" meaning gold.
 

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A couple more, we believe this is 1893, A kid who hung around with my Great Grandpa
Wood Trunk Rectangle Bedrock Art

Here is one 1910, Great Grandpa again
Plant Leaf Wood Handwriting Branch

Another 1907 Friend of Great Grandpa
Plant Wood Branch Trunk Vegetation

It is quite interesting to see these over 100 years old and the heritage that I feel when walking, hunting and the sheep herd is still in these same areas. Never Met my Great Grandpa, but feel his company when in these areas.
 

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I know this picture isn't a tree -- so it kind of doesn't fit with the original topic. But it kind of does too. I know that there are older "carvings" in rock than this. But I think the original topic relates back to white man carvings in trees. I don't know that native americans carved in trees.

Anywho....I have absolutely no doubt to the authenticity of these names and dates carved into the sandstone. These are in a very remote canyon out on the Escalante desert. There are a lot of native american carvings and paintings in this same canyon. 1900 and then again 1904. Allen. There is history of Allen's in Escalante. I'd love to know the story them being in this canyon. I'd guess they were running cattle or sheep -- but don't really know. Maybe they were looking for Dinosaurs?

 
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Found this one last week while muzzle loading for spikes. It was in the bottom of a canyon far from any road or trail in the middle of nowhere. It was an old sheep camp and the Quakie was dead and all but ready to fall over. This carving was from 1916.

Plant Wood Trunk Terrestrial plant Natural landscape


The funniest carving I’ve seen was underneath a treestand that someone else obviously didn’t want there. Made me laugh preety good.

Twig Wood Electricity Trunk Overhead power line
 

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This is the most common one on the Zion unit by far......you will find his name anywhere and everywhere there is a Quakie tree in Dixie National Forest or on Cedar mountain.
Plant Branch Wood Trunk Natural landscape

Don't get me wrong, he is a nice guy and a charter member of Ats Queo, the Cedar City archery club that was started in the mid 50's.
It just had always amazed me how he had the time to do that many carvings, and still have time to hunt.
 
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