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I have found that the apples bring in lots of does and fawns, but not really the bucks, esp. the bigger ones.
The elk really like the salt rocks from Redmond though. I have pictures on the trail cams of elk laying down next to the lick for 2 or 3 hours at a time working on it.
 

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Hunters. Curing mineral deficiencies one trophy rock at a time.
I'm going to start a not-for-profit called "Hunters for Descended Testicles" and every member who pays their dues get a free trophy rock.
 

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Why buy trophy rock or buck jam or any other overpriced wildlife mineral supplement when you can spend $6 for a 50 lbs livestock salt block that does the same thing (IFA/Cal Ranch). You can break the livestock blocks in half really easy by forcefully knocking the middle of the block against the sidewalk curb or any hard angled surface. Have done it for years to make nice 25 lbs blocks easy to haul around. That's $3 for a 25 lbs block compared to $20 trophy rock of a similar size. Trophy rock is for yuppies who like to throw money away.
 

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Hunters. Curing mineral deficiencies one trophy rock at a time.
The only way you guys know how........by putting out stuff that won't help the deer or you.

Seriously, by the time the hunts roll around they are going to be mostly off the minerals. When the velvet comes off, and the fawns are weaned, there just is not a draw for it. So you have to start early, not the week before the opener.

And when they are on minerals heavy(May, June, July), you need to know what minerals draw them in, which is the minerals they need, and trophy rock is missing the most important one.
 

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The only way you guys know how........by putting out stuff that won't help the deer or you.

Seriously, by the time the hunts roll around they are going to be mostly off the minerals. When the velvet comes off, and the fawns are weaned, there just is not a draw for it. So you have to start early, not the week before the opener.

And when they are on minerals heavy(May, June, July), you need to know what minerals draw them in, which is the minerals they need, and trophy rock is missing the most important one.
See... I just put out a lonetree trophy rock in my last post and it worked like a charm.
 

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I get the trophy rock for a lot less than $20. I have run the 50 lb salt blocks and they hit the trophy rock a whole bunch better. Even when they are side by side. And, I put them out as soon as i get into the place in April or May. Not a week before the hunt.
To make matters worse..........I don't hunt over mine.
 

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I get the trophy rock for a lot less than $20. I have run the 50 lb salt blocks and they hit the trophy rock a whole bunch better. Even when they are side by side. And, I put them out as soon as i get into the place in April or May. Not a week before the hunt.
To make matters worse..........I don't hunt over mine.
I've done side by sides with just about everything out there. I've bought and placed well over a ton of salt and mineral products just this year.

When we are talking about salt blocks, it's simply just sodium chloride(salt) that they are going after. This draw has long been known. But when you are looking at individual minerals, there are only a handful that have been documented to draw wildlife, in addition to salt.

These individual minerals that create a draw are selenium, copper, and magnesium. Cobalt, iodine, and sulfur are showing some promise, but I need to separate them out to see what exactly is going on, these are all in conjunction with selenium blocks, and is probably related.

Trophy rock has copper and magnesium, but in very low quantities, and it has zero selenium which has been documented as the major draw.

Se-90 blocks are ~$7 and work better than just about anything out there.
 

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Lonetree,

How do they know that the blocks have selinium in them? Does it have a distinct smell they can distinguish? If the selinium blocks are the biggest draw, how do the deer ID a selinium block vs a non-selinium block?
 

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Lonetree,

How do they know that the blocks have selinium in them? Does it have a distinct smell they can distinguish? If the selinium blocks are the biggest draw, how do the deer ID a selinium block vs a non-selinium block?
The mechanism(s) that drive ungulates to seek out certain nutritional and or mineral requirements isn't fully known. They do however, have the ability to seek out what their body requires. In we humans, we get 'cravings' for certain foods (which contain certain nutrients/minerals) that is associated with 'emotional stress' for the most part, but may also have to deal with what our bodies are needing at the time; may be the same in critters. It is known that certain animals can detect a variety of minerals in food sources, pretty interesting stuff.

Here is a fun little study done here in Utah that sheds some light on the subject. Make sure to read all the way down to the end to grasp the identification associations. Hope it helps...

http://digitalcommons.usu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1107&context=etd
 

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"We assessed the mineral status of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) during a winter-feeding program in Utah. We found that both serum and liver samples of fed deer were marginal to low in Se, Zn, and Cu. We also found that fed deer selected forages high in selenium (Se), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). When we offered fed deer on winter range a choice between Cu-amended and plain ration, they selected a diet of 42% Cu-amended ration. During spring, they did not decrease intake of the Cu-amended ration as quickly as the plain ration (F3, 67 =5.02, P < 0.003)."


"High-preference forage was highest in Mo, lowest in Cu, and contained moderate levels of Se and Zn (Table 4-2). Moderate-preference forage contained the most Cu, Se,

and Zn with moderate amounts of Mo. Lowest-preference forage had moderate levels of Cu, but was lowest in Se, Mo, and Zn. Preferred sagebrush contained 70% more Zn, 65% more Cu and 190% more Se than non-preferred sagebrush. It also had 33% less Mo than non-preferred sagebrush"


"This winter-feeding enhanced body condition, and increased adult female survival. When dynamics of fed and non-fed study groups were modeled over five years, the model predicted both populations were declining, with a lower rate of decline in the fed population. The primary cause of mortality for fed and non-fed groups, deer-vehicle collision, nullified benefits accrued from feeding."

Deer were going after the sagebrush with 190% more selenium in it, despite having mineral amended feed pellets fed to them. The deer would stop on their way to and from the feed grounds to feed on specific sagebrush plants that had the higher levels of selenium in them. This was all in proximity to a road, that many of these deer frequented.
 
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