Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering if anyone with experience with these two hunts (specifically archery) would be willing to share. Which do you like better? Why?

I live in Utah and have had success on the any bull units, but it’s becoming more and more of a rat race with crowds, even way back in wilderness areas. I’ve killed multiple bulls on the general Utah hunt but I’ve also hunted in almost every other western state besides Colorado and had a better experience in all of them over Utah (granted, not all were general hunts but those that were general were better). I did not draw an out of state tag this year so I am debating the Utah otc or Colorado otc archery hunt. When I look at the success rates between the two hunts, they are pretty similar but Colorado has a lot more elk. My main reason for picking Colorado over Utah would be if it’s less crowded in Colorado relative to Utah. Because there are so many otc units in Colorado and a large herd does that thin people out? I have horses and can get way back in but these days that doesn’t get you away from people in Utah. Could i get away on a Colorado otc archery hunt in an roadless area or are those typically packed too?

Any words of wisdom or sharing of experiences/comparisons if you’ve done both of these hunts would be much appreciated. Thank you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,047 Posts
Colorado has way more elk habitat than Utah ever will. We will never be able to compete with CO for tag availability or less crowds.

-DallanC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,923 Posts
Over 215,000 elk tags sold in Colorado. I'm not sure the amount of habitat will make a big difference in crowds.

I'm sure others will chime in.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,777 Posts
Colorado is just like Utah as far as crowds. But just like Utah if you get off of the roads you can eliminate a number of hunters. Plus if you hunt after the labor day weekend you cut down on the crowds even more.

A area that I bow hunted elk sees very few hunters, but the problem is that you start out at 10,000' and have to hike down to 8,000-7,000 feet. Then if you bag a elk you have to pack it back up to 10,000 feet. That eliminates a lot of hunters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,148 Posts
Depends on where you're going in CO. Some areas like around Grand Junction may be more heavily populated with hunters because of reputation, while others may not.

It's been years since I hunted CO, we mostly hunted the southwest corner of the state when we did. It has been pretty stable as far as numbers of people go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I love CO, but only hunt late season now. The harsher weather turns a lot of people away, but it's still busy. As mentioned though it's still busy with hunters, but thins out drastically just a bit off the roads. The area I go however has a road every other mile it seems so you're never truly away from it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Over 215,000 elk tags sold in Colorado. I'm not sure the amount of habitat will make a big difference in crowds.

I'm sure others will chime in.

That's my concern. Yes a lot more elk and habitat but a LOT more hunters.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,777 Posts
Over 215,000 elk tags sold in Colorado. I'm not sure the amount of habitat will make a big difference in crowds.

I'm sure others will chime in.
That's my concern. Yes a lot more elk and habitat but a LOT more hunters.
You also have to figure that those numbers are spread out over a number of seasons including archery.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,777 Posts
One thing that you also have to pay attention to here in Colorado is that there are a number of areas that are going away from the either sex elk archery tag. There are a few units around me just off of I-70 along with some down in the south west that are bull only for archery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
One thing that you also have to pay attention to here in Colorado is that there are a number of areas that are going away from the either sex elk archery tag. There are a few units around me just off of I-70 along with some down in the south west that are bull only for archery.

I noticed that. I'm only interested in a branch antlered bull, do you think the lack of either sex option deters other hunters?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,777 Posts
A big thing for out of state hunters is getting value for their tag cost. They usually come out here for at least a full week and after a few day of not being able to bag a bull they will set their sights on a cow or the first one that comes within range. You have to figure that with the tag pushing $700 for a either sex elk tag that they want to take some meat home.

One advantage to hunting the OTC archery units is that you now have a qualifying license to put in for the draws and can build points for a better limited tag area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Colorado is just like Utah as far as crowds. But just like Utah if you get off of the roads you can eliminate a number of hunters. Plus if you hunt after the labor day weekend you cut down on the crowds even more.

A area that I bow hunted elk sees very few hunters, but the problem is that you start out at 10,000' and have to hike down to 8,000-7,000 feet. Then if you bag a elk you have to pack it back up to 10,000 feet. That eliminates a lot of hunters.
That sounds like the spot I hunt in Utah!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,148 Posts
A big thing for out of state hunters is getting value for their tag cost. They usually come out here for at least a full week and after a few day of not being able to bag a bull they will set their sights on a cow or the first one that comes within range. You have to figure that with the tag pushing $700 for a either sex elk tag that they want to take some meat home.

One advantage to hunting the OTC archery units is that you now have a qualifying license to put in for the draws and can build points for a better limited tag area.
Which is why for a NR of both UT and CO, CO makes more sense. The tag price is the same, but in CO you can shoot a branch antlered bull whereas is UT you can only shoot a spike or cow.

From a "cost benefit analysis", CO wins. I don't hunt UT anymore because of that.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top