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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My daughter wants to get involved in shooting/hunting. Problem is that she is 8 years old and very small for her age. I'm looking for like a 223 or something of the sort that she can eventually use on coyotes and learn to shoot at longer ranges with the similar ballistics of a higher powered rifle.
My concern is the kick from the gun for her, what are your opionions on the 223 or a similar caliber with minimum recoile and cheap amunition?
Thanks
 

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The best starter in my opinion, would be a 22lr. Cricket makes a cute little single shot that weighs about 2 pounds. I think that Savage makes a youth model as well. As far as a centerfire, the 223 would be tough to beat. The NEF (or is it H&R) HandiRifle should work out well. I believe they make a youth model with a shorter stock, and they may have a combo kit that has a 20 gage shotgun barrel as well.
 

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The qualifier of cheap ammo , then I would go with the .223. That said , if you know of someone with the .204, give it a shot (pun intended). If you think the .223 has no recoil you won't believe the .204. Nothing. And flat . 11-15 in. drop at 400 yds. It will smoke P-dogs way out there. With the right bullet yotes don't know what hit em. The yoters are using the 35 grn. Bergers.
 

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A .22 LR should be EVERYBODY's starter rifle, no matter what the age, IMO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Al, isn't the 204 a newer caliber? and is the price of ammo similar to a 223?

As far as a 22lr starter, I agree with you but with money being as tight as it is now, I am trying to look ahead and combine to minimize costs.
 

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Ah hell just dive in. Get her a 300 ultra mag. She will love you forever. JK. I would say a rugar 10/22. They last forever and have a very nice resale value, from what I have seen. Then when she is ready to graduate she can sell the rugar and get a .223 or 204 or my new low recoil favorite .243. With a 58 gr bullet the .243 has very little recoil, I would say slightly higher than a .223, but with far more versatility and you can get ammo cheap. A box of remington 100 gr sp's are like 13-15 bucks.
 

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Mntman said:
Al, isn't the 204 a newer caliber? and is the price of ammo similar to a 223?

As far as a 22lr starter, I agree with you but with money being as tight as it is now, I am trying to look ahead and combine to minimize costs.
.204 is about 3-4 years old now. Cost of ammo ?? I don't know, I reload. :wink:
 

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Rossi makes a combo gun that has barrels for .243, .22 lr, and 20 gauge shotgun. Its not a super classy looking gun, but the versatility makes it attractive as a starter gun. Plus when she grows out of it you could just keep it in the truck for a multi-use hunting weapon.
 

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She's 8 years old....don't be silly...don't even consider anything other than a .22 LR. Teach her gun safety, take her out offen with at least a brick of ammo and let her shoot it up. Plenty of time for hunting when she can shoot and handle a gun safely. She is pretty small so buy her one of the youth model rifles (.22 LR) that will fit her correctly. Believe me, given a properly fitting rifle and enough ammo..she'll become a great shot. You say you are on a budget...teaching her to shot with any high power rifle will cost you a bundle!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
ChaserOfAllBirds said:
Rossi makes a combo gun that has barrels for .243, .22 lr, and 20 gauge shotgun. Its not a super classy looking gun, but the versatility makes it attractive as a starter gun. Plus when she grows out of it you could just keep it in the truck for a multi-use hunting weapon.
I just found these yesterday at Gander Mountain. I agree, not the best of gun but she will have 2-3 guns to use and grow with. They are only $199 :D this way if she turns out to not like shooting/hunting, no big loss on my wallet.
 

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I remember from when I was that age that recoil was my greatest fear; for her to enjoy it she would need to be comfortable. .223 certainly does not have significant recoil, but the 22LR sure is much easier to manage, much cheaper and easy to get comfortable with. Good luck and have fun; that is the most important!
 

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I'm not sure why anyone would consider a .223 for an 8 year old. My first gun came along around that age but it was a Daisey BB gun. I was able to learn gun safety and how to shoot without really being able to hurt myself, even from the ricochet that hit me in the forehead. Two years later I was given increased firepower with a Benjamin pellet gun. I finally got a Ruger 10/22 when I was twelve and have been hunting with that ever since. It seems to me that a .223 at that early age is a little much. I would recomend something with a little less firepower to learn on.
 

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I think ACHY is right- go with the Red Rider. I got one for Xmas when I was six.
From that point on, I became a shootin' fool. For five years after that, I used my weekly allowance ($5) to buy a carton of BB's every week, which I used up. EVERY week. (I had a fairly big back yard, but I did have neighbors. They NEVER complained- because I was safe and respectful. When I was 12, I graduated to pump-up Crossman, and started shooting pellets instead- sniping at little plastic 'army men'.
Sure, I had a .22- but it was a rabbit gun and I knew that.
My curiosity about firearms was sated by the use of an airgun- I never felt the desire to sneak into the office (where the gun cabinet was) when dad wasn't home and play with the 'big guns'.
In fact, on my 14th b-day, the gun cabinet key was given to ME because I had proven that I was safe and responsible with a gun. Dad was seldom home, and the home defense shotgun was in there too.
Due to the sheer volume of shooting for so many years, I learned full well that something as pipsqueak as a Red Rider was still very dangerous.
After that came a 20 ga, a .30-30, then a .308 Win.
By then, the technique was ingrained in muscle memory and I never flinched, until I ruined both shoulders much later.
The point is- the caliber is irrelevant. Practice is the key- whether it's a .22 or .243 or pellet gun. When she's old enough to shoot something bigger, she'll know she's ready and that recoil comes with the territory. With practice, she could handle an '06 if she wants. Then again, why give her a flinch she doesn't have?
Start with a Daisy. then, go to Gallenson's and pick up a used Marlin .22 for $100. when she completes hunter ed and wants to hunt big game or upland game, get one of those Rossi combos or maybe even a used Contender.
She'll have her own little arsenal with a max cash outlay of around $450 total- broken up over several years.
if she wants something else, by then she can get an after-school job and earn her own d*mn rifle.
So, in effect- she learns safety, respect,and fiscal responsibility over the formative years of her life. Lessons learned that not only apply to becoming an ethical hunter and shooter, but a good citizen as well.
 

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Best post I have read in a while, SingleShot.
 
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