Utah Wildlife Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,984 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I watch DU tv all the time and it seems like every time the dude on there cooks ducks or geese he basically just sears the meat for 3 minutes on each side and then serves it up. I have always been under the impression that ALL poultry, be it chicken, duck, goose, turkey, or whatever other type of bird needs to be cooked through. That's not to say it needs to be overcooked, because I know chicken can be cooked through, but still juicy and flavorful. But I have heard it said that if duck or goose is cooked through, its overcooked. With the possibility of the Bird Flu out there (I know, I know, the government says the chances are slim), I don't see how you wouldn't cook waterfowl thoroughly. So my question is this- With all these things considered, how do you cook your waterfowl? and Are you concerned at all about the Bird Flu issue?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,667 Posts
Don't know about bird flu and all of that...I guess I live by the old saying "something is gonna git ya sooner or later". I cooked up some duck for lunch today...sliced it across the breast into finger sized chuncks, breaded them with flour and a bit of salt and pepper, heated the oil up pretty hot and tossed in the pieces. Turned them once and ate! Yummy!
My wife said, "there is still blood coming out", I told her that too well done duck tastes like liver. Those pieces tasted almost like beef and real tender!
Oh ya and I love liver! But it has to be liver I'm eating that tastes like liver, or it ain't good meat to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
Cook it like chicken to 165 deg internal (I cook to 160 and let it rest, during which time the internal temp will climb and be done just right). It will still be juicy, but cooked enough to kill any nasties.

If you don't have an instant-read thermo, get one. They're cheap and essential for many types of cooking.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,501 Posts
Our little meat thermometer has a scale on it, showing what temp is safe for what kind of meat. We shoot for 165 internal temp on poultry though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,021 Posts
The very best way to ruin wild game is to over cook it. No matterr what the game.

This is why most people don't care for wild game. They think they need to cook the ever loving crap out of it so it's safe, and in doing so they turn it into boot leather. :x Then they wonder why it tasts like chit. :shock: Duh...

Wild game needn't be cremated to be "safe" as mentioned by Fattbass, it is void of all the goodies that make you sick. It's the purest protein on the planet baby!

As Uncle Ted would say, "pure rocket fuel for my rock & role body."
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top