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West side Utah Lake
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I purchased a T53 a during the summer which is essentially the chicom version of the M44 Mosin Nagant carbine. The stock isn't in great shape and will require some refinishing, the metal isn't in great shape either but no pitting that I am seeing but I haven't removed the wood and looked underneath. My question is this, since I am not interested in keeping it as is (I am a purist but to an extent) what type of finish would you put on the metal. I am thinking parkerizing or something similar but really have no experience other than standard hot bluing. I want something that will not shine and will last and put up with some abuse if it comes to that. Not quite sure what I will do with the wood, if the gouges come out ok and the wood looks halfway decent under the gunk I will refinish it. If it still looks like crap I may decide to break down and go with an Archangel stock and 10 round detachable mag. What would you do to the metal?
 

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You could try bead blasting most of the metal parts and then applying a finish. An inexpensive bead/sand blaster and compressor is what you need. Blasting hides dings or scratches in the metal pretty good and gives you a nice non-reflective finish that kind of resembles a parkerized finish. You could apply a Dura-Coat finish or something similar, which would adhere really well to the blasted surface. You could even apply a cold blue, which goes on evenly on a blasted surface and is easy to touch up, but is not as durable as a hot blue.

I finished a stock on a Japanese Arisaka that was dinged and gouged. I wasn't sure how it would look, but after steaming dings and careful sanding, it turned out really nice. I could not remove all the dings or gouges, but they actually look good. I sprayed a satin finish on it and it looks like the original.
 

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I have used some High Heat spray paint before in black...I applied it, baked it on using several bake/cool/bake/cool cycles. Seems to hold up very well and provides a nice flat black finish when done. As for the wood, I prefer to let the wood speak for itself by using a clear polyurethane or oil based varnish that dries very hard and allows the grain to show through (I'm using some on my walnut countertops currently).

Here is the stuff used on my old Savage/Stevens 311 20ga.

 

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Hey I refinished a Stevens 410 a while back. I even posted pictures of it here somewhere. I just stained the wood and sprayed it down with polyurathane. its held up great over the years.

-DallanC
 
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