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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anybody know anything about these? I may have found some. What is the legality of harvesting one for meat. I don't want to get into trouble. Maybe pay the BLM leaseholder a small fee? Any experiences?
 

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A couple things. First, they are not wild cows. They are probably free-ranging cows, and belong to someone. And second, you may not shoot one for meat. If you really want to shoot a cow for meat, talk to a rancher and tell him you want to pay him so you can shoot one of his cows. He'll want the money up front, and will go out into the field/range and do it with you. If you do go this route, be sure you have some papers drawn up with him granting you permission to do it. Heck, even take a video of him giving you permission and going on the 'hunt'. Because when you end up in court, you'll need all the help you can get.

As a side note here - shooting livestock is not something that any hunter would consider ethical or worthy of discussion for the most part. There have been discussions in the past about shooting ferel pigs, or even pigs at a farm or two in Northern Utah, as well as shooting ranch raised bison. These certainly are discussed as being part of the hunting world. But a cow hunt? I'm not sure I see the point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
oaky, let's say for the sake of argument they are unbranded and haven't ever in their life (3+ years) been rounded up. Natural reproduction has been going on like with the mustangs. They have been abandoned. Do they still belong to the BLM leaseholder? Whose property are they?
You can rest assured I will not shoot a branded animal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'd assume the animals on fiftymile mountain are branded, but this is a similar situation to the ones I am talking about. No human contact for 3+ years even by the leaseholder.


The world of trophy hunting took on a new meaning this last week, when
Steve Westhoff and Quinn Griffin started guiding trophy hunts for wild
bulls, on their grazing allotment
on Fifty Mile Mountain.
What makes a wild bull such
a special trophy? For starters,
they rank right there with grizzly
bear as far as meanness and danger
goes, when wounded. A wild
bull is much more elusive than
a moose, elk or buffalo, and the
horns are more valuable. If you
have followed the news in southern
Utah the past few years, you
are aware of the frustration the
BLM has endured in their effort to
rid Fifty Mile Mountain of the unmanageable
animals. They could
not do it with horses, planes of
helicopters. This mountain has
no peer for being the most rugged,
inaccessible, desolate area
in the United States. Throw in
the scenic beauty, Indian lore and
uniqueness, make this new venture
a must do.
Don’t think you will be pampered
in a fi ne lodge, with a hot
tub waiting for you in the evening,
or riding out to the hunting area
in the nice soft confi nes of a new
pickup. No, this hunt is equivalent
to when there was no electricity,
television, or automobiles.
You can stay in an old log
cabin, that dates back to the pioneer
days. Eat food prepared in
a dutch oven, and all transportation
will be on foot or the back of
a mule or horse.
If all this has not scared you off, and you are still frustrated with not being
able to draw a trophy tag, why not give Steve a call for more information
on how you can reserve time for your hunt.
Steve can be reached at 435-310-0205 and Quinn at 435-616-4660, they are
waiting for your call.
Shop at Hurst Sports Center corner of Bluff and St. George Blvd. for your
hunting supplies. 435.673.6141.
 

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I can't tell if you are kidding or not but that was one of the funniest things I've heard in a long time. I especially like the Hurst Sporting Goods promo thrown in!!! Long live the wild bull and his majestic beauty!!! *(())*
 

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Those who know their Mormon history will tell you that the only casualties suffered by the Mormon Batallion were the result of a run-in with a group of wild bulls. Thats good stuff right there. If the rancher with the grazing allotment can get people to pay him to come and shoot his cows off his allotment, then good for him. It beats hiring helicopters and whatever else to come in and try chasing them off.
 

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I'll guarantee you those cows belong to somebody......brand or not. But even if they are truly wild, they don't let you shoot wild horses, they don't let you shoot wild burros, why do you think they'd let you shoot wild cows??

I dunno, I think I'd drop the idea of shooting these cows and concentrate on getting a deer and elk instead. :(
 

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they don't let you shoot wild horses, they don't let you shoot wild burros
Wild horses and burros are protected by the Wild Horse and Burro Act. That is why you cannot shoot them. There is no Wild Cow Act.

"wild cows" belong to the permittee. You cannot shoot them without his/her permission because that would be destruction of private property. Like I mentioned before though, if you do get permission to pop one, be sure to get that in writing from the permittee/cow owner.
 
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