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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw this in one of the local papers. A number of wild horses were shot and left.

While I think that something should be done about the herds I believe that this is the wrong answer to the problem.

 

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Interesting article for sure!

It's also interesting that we, as humans, pick and choose which "feral" or "non-native" species we allow to exist and others that we eliminate...
Really no different than how we choose which species to regulate as "game".

I hadn't realized there were these types of vigilante killings of wild horses going on. I'm largely against their presence on federal land but that really doesn't matter in the big picture. Outside of designated management areas how are they regulated? I ask as a couple articles mention the boundaries and the potential, in the linked incident, they are horses that crossed the San Juan from tribal land.
 

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So there are areas where feral horses aren’t protected? I wish that we could manage them like any other large animal on our landscapes.
How do they know they were “wild” horses?Maybe with the price of hay some Navajos down there got tired of feeding them.
 

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If I turned a pack malamutes loose and they fended for themselves would we call them wild?
What about all the field lions runnin around in rural areas with no home. Are they wild cats?
Yup cats gone wild. Feral. In French Polynesia, packs of feral dogs run around wild.
 

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Interesting article for sure!

It's also interesting that we, as humans, pick and choose which "feral" or "non-native" species we allow to exist and others that we eliminate...
Horses not indigenous to the area. That having been said, this was wanton waste and not necessary. If they were on private land, then its predation. Different story.
 

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So there are areas where feral horses aren’t protected? I wish that we could manage them like any other large animal on our landscapes.
How do they know they were “wild” horses?Maybe with the price of hay some Navajos down there got tired of feeding them.
I can't find a clean answer to the range question. From the simple text of the law it sounds like all wild horses are protected but I keep seeing references to herds as & where they existed in 1971. I'm guessing it's the first but I'm not certain.

And the law's definition captures any free roaming horse or burro that's unbranded.

How things have changed since 1971, when the law passed unanimously.
 

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I feel like they’re competing with Elk and Deer, especially Cedar City South. I don’t think it should be handled with neglect like leaving them, but should be dealt with how Australia deals with Camels. I get that they’re a useful animal, but they’re still an animal.
 

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I wish animals were managed on a for profit basis, on wait, they all ready are. Except these feral horses get a free pass. If feral horses are destroying the landscape that income generating wildlife need, kill all the feral horses. Hundreds of millions of tax payers dollars are WASTED each year on these sage rats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hundreds of millions of tax payers dollars are WASTED each year on these sage rats.
That is the biggest problem with wild horses.

A few years ago I heard that if they are not adopted after a roundup they are put out to pasture on private pastureland with the cost passed on to the taxpayer. My mind is foggy on what the government pays but $30 a day or week sticks in my mind on what the owner of the pasture gets per horse.

As to what to do with them, I had some zebra last June in Africa and it was pretty dang good.


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That is the biggest problem with wild horses.

A few years ago I heard that if they are not adopted after a roundup they are put out to pasture on private pastureland with the cost passed on to the taxpayer. My mind is foggy on what the government pays but $30 a day or week sticks in my mind on what the owner of the pasture gets per horse.

As to what to do with them, I had some zebra last June in Africa and it was pretty dang good.


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Could you imaging the day the Utah hunters were sent after the wild horses?!? 😂
 

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That is the biggest problem with wild horses.

A few years ago I heard that if they are not adopted after a roundup they are put out to pasture on private pastureland with the cost passed on to the taxpayer. My mind is foggy on what the government pays but $30 a day or week sticks in my mind on what the owner of the pasture gets per horse.

As to what to do with them, I had some zebra last June in Africa and it was pretty dang good.


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Read today that it costs ~ $50k to maintain unadopted horses for the rest of their lives. It's an obscene amount of money when you realize the captive population is 50k.

I disagree that the priority should be income producing animals but we get to affect that via law. And right now the BLM is bound by law to balance wild horses (and burros) alongside other interests. Unless the law is changed that's going to remain the case.

Sadly no one seems to like the balance. Animal activists think the herds should be much bigger. Others think even the 27k goal is too high.

And the DNA data isn't going to make it any easier. Most of the herds are evidently mongrels with overlap in domestic horses. But there are actually some genetically unique herds that will complicate any future amendments.

The entire mess exposes how human error compounds over generations. And how even the most well intentioned laws can go awry. I don't envy anyone tasked with this debacle.
 
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